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Oct. 19th Seminar at UC Davis: Do Butterflies Dream of Genetic Tattoos?

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Do butterflies dream of genetic tattoos? That's part of the creative title of a seminar that Arnaud Martin, assistant professor of biology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, will deliver next week to the UC Davis Department of Entomology and...

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)
Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

'Honey, I Hardly Know Ya!' The UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center Can Change That!

Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Honey, I hardly know ya!" The UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center can change that! Want to learn more about the product that honey bees make? The UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center is offering a Sensory Evaluation of Honey Certificate...

Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two UC graduate students chosen to assist UC ANR Global Food Initiative efforts

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Melanie Colvin
Two University of California graduate students have been selected by UC Agriculture and Natural Resources as UC Global Food Initiative (GFI) fellows for 2018-19. Graduate students Melanie Colvin at UC Berkeley and Maci Mueller at UC Davis will work with ANR academics and staff to conduct and communicate about UC research for improved food security and agricultural sustainability.

Melanie Colvin, a graduate student at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health, focuses on addressing nutrition-related diseases through preventative measures. As a GFI fellow, Colvin will work with Nutrition Policy Institute researchers to conduct a secondary analysis of the Healthy Communities Study, a six-year observational study that included more than 5,000 children and their families from 130 communities in the United States. The native of Chapel Hill, NC, will analyze the relationship between household food insecurity and physical activity. Colvin plans to pursue a Ph.D. with a goal of a career in public health research.

"The GFI fellowship allows me to experience many facets of developing meaningful research questions that I will address on my own one day as a principal investigator," Colvin said.

Maci Mueller
Maci Mueller, a doctoral student in animal biology at UC Davis, is interested in a career at the interface of agricultural science and policy, particularly related to the problems that might be solved using innovative breeding tools, such as gene editing. Using a variety of communication tools, the Princeton, Neb., native will work with UC ANR's Strategic Communications team to inform the public about UC ANR's contributions to agricultural, food and nutrition research and related policies.

“I am excited to learn from the UC ANR's Strategic Communications team and for the opportunity as a GFI fellow to gain hands-on agricultural research communication experience,” Mueller said.

In addition to their individual projects, the 2018-19 GFI fellows are invited to participate in systemwide activities designed to enhance their leadership skills and enrich their understanding of the food system in California.

The UC Global Food Initiative was launched by UC President Janet Napolitano in 2014 with the aim of putting UC, California and the world on a pathway to sustainability. The GFI fellows are part of a group of approximately 50 UC graduate and undergraduate students working on food-related projects at all 10 UC campuses, UC Office of the President, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and UC ANR. Each participant receives a $4,000 award to help fund student-generated research, projects or internships that support the initiative's efforts to address the issue of how to sustainably and nutritiously feed a world population expected to reach 8 billion by 2025.

 

 

Melanie Colvin, left, and Maci Mueller.
Melanie Colvin, left, and Maci Mueller.

Posted on Thursday, October 11, 2018 at 3:43 PM
Focus Area Tags: Food

Find the Green Darner

Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State  Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the green darner. Trying to spot the green darner dragonfly, Anax junius--so named because of its resemblance to a darning needle--is like finding the proverbial needle in a haystack. But there it was, camouflaged in shrubbery on Sept. 23 in the...

Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State  Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 5:00 PM

Dark Rover Ant: Current Status in California

Figure 1. Dark rover ant (Credit: Siavash Taravati, UC IPM)

[From the Fall 2018 issue of UC IPM's Green Bulletin newsletter] The dark rover ant (Brachymyrmex patagonicus) is an invasive species which is increasingly being noticed in Southern California. It is a nuisance species that invades structures as both...

Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 10:42 AM
Tags: ant (2), invasive (44), pest management professional (1), rover (1), structural (1), Taravati (2), UC IPM (193)
Focus Area Tags: Pest Management Yard & Garden

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