UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Lynn Kimsey

Let's Help the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day/Month by Feb. 28

Entomologist Jeff Smith, a volunteer, curates the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) section at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The volunteers--faculty, staff and students--who are presenting science-based information during the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Month are doing an amazing job. As you may remember, over the last nine years, this event was a single day, the...

Entomologist Jeff Smith, a volunteer, curates the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) section at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, a volunteer, curates the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) section at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, a volunteer, curates the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) section at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum specimens include the Xerces blue butterfly, Glaucopsyche xerces, now extinct. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart Museum specimens include the Xerces blue butterfly, Glaucopsyche xerces, now extinct. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum specimens include the Xerces blue butterfly, Glaucopsyche xerces, now extinct. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, February 18, 2021 at 4:16 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Family, Innovation, Natural Resources

Murder Hornets: Murder in the First Degree?

The Asian giant hornet, which the news media named

Want to learn about "murder hornets?" Entomologists cringe every time someone substitutes the moniker, "murder hornet," for the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia. They probably think this qualifies as murder in the first degree! No, no, no!...

The Asian giant hornet, which the news media named
The Asian giant hornet, which the news media named "murder hornet." (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)

The Asian giant hornet, which the news media named "murder hornet." (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)

Posted on Monday, February 15, 2021 at 5:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Pest Management

About Those Black Widow Spiders...

A black widow spider juggles two egg sacs that she deposited on the lip of a swimming pool in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A reader asks: Does the UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology have a fact sheet on black widow spiders?  Yes! It's among dozens of fact sheets (mostly insects but some arachnids and other non-insects) posted on the Bohart Museum website. All...

A black widow spider juggles two egg sacs that she deposited on the lip of a swimming pool in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black widow spider juggles two egg sacs that she deposited on the lip of a swimming pool in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black widow spider juggles two egg sacs that she deposited on the lip of a swimming pool in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, January 7, 2021 at 4:55 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Amazing Lady Beetles

A lady beetle searching for aphids on a rosebud in the winter. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you have roses blooming in your yard in the winter--or trying to bloom--check to see if there's a lady beetle, aka ladybug prowling around. Any aphids?  A lady beetle can eat as many as 5000 aphids in its lifetime, so they're the good guys and...

A lady beetle searching for aphids on a rosebud in the winter. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle searching for aphids on a rosebud in the winter. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle searching for aphids on a rosebud in the winter. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A toxic chemical, a defense mechanism, oozing from a lady beetle, the prey of a cellar spider in this summer image. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A toxic chemical, a defense mechanism, oozing from a lady beetle, the prey of a cellar spider in this summer image. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A toxic chemical, a defense mechanism, oozing from a lady beetle, the prey of a cellar spider in this summer image. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, January 6, 2021 at 4:31 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Searching for the First Bumble Bee of the Year in a Two-County Area

Allan Jones of Davis captured this image of a black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, on Jan. 6, 2020 in the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Allan Jones)

Seen any bumble bees lately in Yolo or Solano counties? If so, and if you photograph the first one of the year, you might win the Bohart Museum of Entomology's contest. In memory of native pollinator specialist Robbin...

Allan Jones of Davis captured this image of a black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, on Jan. 6, 2020 in the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Allan Jones)
Allan Jones of Davis captured this image of a black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, on Jan. 6, 2020 in the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Allan Jones)

Allan Jones of Davis captured this image of a black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, on Jan. 6, 2020 in the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, showed up Jan. 1, 2018 at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, showed up Jan. 1, 2018 at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, showed up Jan. 1, 2018 at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on a rose on Jan. 25, 2020 in Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on a rose on Jan. 25, 2020 in Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on a rose on Jan. 25, 2020 in Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 4, 2021 at 4:25 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources

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