UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: honey bee

If a Queen Bee Were to Celebrate Mother's Day...

A queen bee (No. 58) and her retinue. This image is from Susan Cobey's colony.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If a queen bee were to celebrate Mother's Day (and she won't because she's too busy laying eggs), what a crowded festivity that would be.  Bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey of Washington State University, former manager of the Harry...

A queen bee (No. 58) and her retinue. This image is from Susan Cobey's colony.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A queen bee (No. 58) and her retinue. This image is from Susan Cobey's colony.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A queen bee (No. 58) and her retinue. This image is from Susan Cobey's colony.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The queen bee is much larger than the worker bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The queen bee is much larger than the worker bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The queen bee is much larger than the worker bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, May 7, 2021 at 3:38 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation

The Bee and the Lygus Bug

A honey bee and a lygus bug sharing a batchelor button in the UC Davis Ecological Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ever seen a beneficial insect and a pest sharing the same blossom? At a recent visit to the UC Davis Ecological Garden at the Student Farm, we watched a honey bee, Apis mellifera, and a lygus bug nymph, Lygus hesperus, foraging...

A honey bee and a lygus bug sharing a batchelor button in the UC Davis Ecological Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee and a lygus bug sharing a batchelor button in the UC Davis Ecological Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee and a lygus bug sharing a batchelor button in the UC Davis Ecological Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee edges closer to the lygus bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee edges closer to the lygus bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee edges closer to the lygus bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The insects meet, the honey bee, the beneficial insect, and the lygus bug, the pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The insects meet, the honey bee, the beneficial insect, and the lygus bug, the pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The insects meet, the honey bee, the beneficial insect, and the lygus bug, the pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 29, 2021 at 4:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

A Touch of Red on Earth Day

A honey bee touches down on a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This plant yield red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's Earth Day, an event we celebrate every April 22 to demonstrate support for environmental protections on our troubled planet. This year's theme: "Restore Our Earth." U.S. Sen. Gaylord Nelson launched Earth Day on April 22, 1970,...

A honey bee touches down on a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This plant yield red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee touches down on a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This plant yield red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee touches down on a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This plant yield red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee rolling around in rock purslane on Earth Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley)
A honey bee rolling around in rock purslane on Earth Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley)

A honey bee rolling around in rock purslane on Earth Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley)

A honey bee packing red pollen from the rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee packing red pollen from the rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee packing red pollen from the rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee leaving a rock purslane and heading off to another one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee leaving a rock purslane and heading off to another one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee leaving a rock purslane and heading off to another one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 22, 2021 at 2:48 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Cleaning the Tongue: A, B, C

A honey bee takes a break and cleans her proboscis (tongue) after foraging on a citrus blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So here you are, a honey bee seeking nectar from an unopened citrus blossom. And then your tongue (proboscis) becomes all sticky with pollen, nectar and other particles. What to do: you, the worker bee, take a brief break and clean your...

A honey bee takes a break and cleans her proboscis (tongue) after foraging on a citrus blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee takes a break and cleans her proboscis (tongue) after foraging on a citrus blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee takes a break and cleans her proboscis (tongue) after foraging on a citrus blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Break over and time to get back to work! A worker bee and a mandarin blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Break over and time to get back to work! A worker bee and a mandarin blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Break over and time to get back to work! A worker bee and a mandarin blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, April 7, 2021 at 3:32 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Food, Natural Resources

UC Davis-Based Projects: To Bee or Not to Bee?

A honey bee foraging on manzanita in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

To bee or not to bee? That's a crucial question as the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day/Month, Honey Bee Haven and the California Master Beekeeper Program scramble for funds between now and Sunday, Feb. 28. That's when the UC...

A honey bee foraging on manzanita in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee foraging on manzanita in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee foraging on manzanita in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Month showcases 12 museums or collections this year, including the Bohart Museum of Entomology. This image shows butterflies from Belize, part of the Bohart collection. They are (far right) Blue Morpho, Morpho helenor montezuma; (top left), a leaf mimic, Fountainea eurypyle confusa; and a blue hairstreak, Pseudolycaena damo, according to entomologist Jeff Smiths who curates the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Month showcases 12 museums or collections this year, including the Bohart Museum of Entomology. This image shows butterflies from Belize, part of the Bohart collection. They are (far right) Blue Morpho, Morpho helenor montezuma; (top left), a leaf mimic, Fountainea eurypyle confusa; and a blue hairstreak, Pseudolycaena damo, according to entomologist Jeff Smiths who curates the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Month showcases 12 museums or collections this year, including the Bohart Museum of Entomology. This image shows butterflies from Belize, part of the Bohart collection. They are (far right) Blue Morpho, Morpho helenor montezuma; (top left), a leaf mimic, Fountainea eurypyle confusa; and a blue hairstreak, Pseudolycaena damo, according to entomologist Jeff Smiths who curates the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, opens a hive at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, opens a hive at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, opens a hive at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, February 26, 2021 at 3:43 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

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