UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: praying mantis

Year 2020 Felt Like a Close Encounter of the Worst Kind

Oops! A Gulf Fritillary, Araulis vanillae, lands near a praying mantis, a female Mantis religiosa, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The year 2020 felt like a close encounter of the worst kind. The raging COVID-19 pandemic, the California wildfires, the political scene, the poverty, the racial uprisings, the stay-at-home mandates, the strife... When the Washington Post recently...

Oops! A Gulf Fritillary, Araulis vanillae, lands near a praying mantis, a female Mantis religiosa, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Oops! A Gulf Fritillary, Araulis vanillae, lands near a praying mantis, a female Mantis religiosa, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oops! A Gulf Fritillary, Araulis vanillae, lands near a praying mantis, a female Mantis religiosa, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis lurches toward the unsuspecting butterfly and tries to snag it with its spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis lurches toward the unsuspecting butterfly and tries to snag it with its spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis lurches toward the unsuspecting butterfly and tries to snag it with its spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Escape! The Gulf Fritillary escapes the predator's clutches. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Escape! The Gulf Fritillary escapes the predator's clutches. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Escape! The Gulf Fritillary escapes the predator's clutches. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, December 31, 2020 at 4:49 PM
Tags: Gulf Fritillary (56), praying mantis (105), predator (25), prey (26), Year 2020 (1), Year 2021 (1)
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Health, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

2020: The COVID Chase

A honey bee buzzing in a patch of catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In the year 2020, COVID chased us out of our work places and out of our fun places. So we dutifully covered our faces to cover all the bases, washed our hands to meet all the demands,  and kept our distance to continue our existence. But wait...we...

A honey bee buzzing in a patch of catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee buzzing in a patch of catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee buzzing in a patch of catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary fluttering toward its host plant, passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary fluttering toward its host plant, passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary fluttering toward its host plant, passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis eating its prey, a Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis eating its prey, a Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis eating its prey, a Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, December 24, 2020 at 4:15 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Family, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Top Secret: Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Is Really a Praying Mantis

Giddy-up! Santa, being the jolly ol' gent he is, drives The Red-Nosed Mantis in front of the Davis home of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)

Sorry, contrary to popular opinion and Western lore, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is NOT a reindeer.  He's a mantis. A masked mantis.  And Santa Claus does not DRIVE a sleigh. The jolly ol' gent RIDES a mantis. A masked mantis.  Take...

Giddy-up! Santa, being the jolly ol' gent he is, drives The Red-Nosed Mantis in front of the Davis home of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)
Giddy-up! Santa, being the jolly ol' gent he is, drives The Red-Nosed Mantis in front of the Davis home of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)

Giddy-up! Santa, being the jolly ol' gent he is, drives The Red-Nosed Mantis in front of the Davis home of entomologists Robert and Lynn Kimsey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Lynn Kimsey)

This praying mantis, photographed in Vacaville, Calif., waits to ambush prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This praying mantis, photographed in Vacaville, Calif., waits to ambush prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This praying mantis, photographed in Vacaville, Calif., waits to ambush prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, December 18, 2020 at 4:36 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Yard & Garden

Passion Is Where You Find It

A female praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, crawls over a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Those passion flowers (Passiflora) are insect magnets. One minute you'll see a praying mantis on a blossom. The next minute, a Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae. And the next morning, the blossom is an arthropod magnet--the beginnings of a spider...

A female praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, crawls over a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, crawls over a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, crawls over a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, lands on a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, lands on a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, lands on a passionflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Notice the spider's thread across the blossom of this passionflower vine? The spider knows where the prey is. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Notice the spider's thread across the blossom of this passionflower vine? The spider knows where the prey is. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Notice the spider's thread across the blossom of this passionflower vine? The spider knows where the prey is. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 21, 2020 at 3:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Will a Praying Mantis Eat a Caterpillar?

Gulf Fritillaries flutter over a praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, in a passionflower patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Will a praying mantis eat a caterpillar? Short answer: Yes. For several days, we've been watching a resident praying mantis, a female Mantis religiosa, hanging out in our patch of Passiflora (passionflower), the host plant of the Gulf...

Gulf Fritillaries flutter over a praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, in a passionflower patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries flutter over a praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, in a passionflower patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries flutter over a praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, in a passionflower patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ahh! The praying mantis finds a non-fluttering target, a Gulf Fritillary munching on the leaves of a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ahh! The praying mantis finds a non-fluttering target, a Gulf Fritillary munching on the leaves of a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ahh! The praying mantis finds a non-fluttering target, a Gulf Fritillary munching on the leaves of a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! The praying mantis stretches her spiked forelegs to reach the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gotcha! The praying mantis stretches her spiked forelegs to reach the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! The praying mantis stretches her spiked forelegs to reach the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Will a praying mantis eat a caterpillar? Yes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Will a praying mantis eat a caterpillar? Yes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Will a praying mantis eat a caterpillar? Yes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis rapidly finishing her dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Praying mantis rapidly finishing her dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis rapidly finishing her dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 12, 2020 at 4:14 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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