UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: spider

Spooky Spiders?

Mature female western black widow spider.

Halloween is the perfect time to talk about some of the creepy, crawlies that scare people the most: Spiders. Many people think that all spiders are dangerous, scary, and aggressive. Most spiders are harmless and serve a beneficial role by catching and...

Posted on Friday, October 31, 2014 at 10:41 AM
Tags: Beneficial Insects (7), Pest Notes (58), spider (22)

Brown Widows Get Foothold in Southern California

Figure 2. A mature adult female brown widow spider showing mottling. (R. Vetter)

[From the February 2013 issue of the UC IPM Green Bulletin newsletter] During the last 10 years, a new widow spider has moved into parts of Southern California. The brown widow spider, Latrodectus geo­metricus, is closely related to the well-known...

Posted on Tuesday, April 22, 2014 at 1:31 PM
Tags: black widow (3), brown widow (1), spider (22)

Drama in the Garden

Honey bee in flight, heading toward a Japanese anemone and unaware of the spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Take one honey bee and one Japanese anemone. Then add one jumping spider. The results don't always turn out so well. But today in the East Asian Collection Garden of the UC Davis Arboretum, everything turned out well--for the honey bee. The bee...

Honey bee in flight, heading toward a Japanese anemone and unaware of the spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee in flight, heading toward a Japanese anemone and unaware of the spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee in flight, heading toward a Japanese anemone and unaware of the jumping spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee forages while the jumping spider lurks. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee forages while the jumping spider lurks. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee forages while the jumping spider lurks. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This was a perfect time for the jumping spider to nail the bee, but it didn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This was a perfect time for the jumping spider to nail the bee, but it didn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This was a perfect time for the jumping spider to nail the bee, but it didn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 at 10:34 PM

Meet the New Tenant

Webweaver spun a web and then crawled into the mason bee condo to occupy a hole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You can't always choose your tenants. Sometimes they choose you. Take the case of our two bee condos, which are blocks of wood drilled with holes for native bee occupancy. One, with the smaller holes, is for leafcutter bees (Megachile spp.) The other,...

Webweaver spun a web and then crawled into the mason bee condo to occupy a hole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Webweaver spun a web and then crawled into the mason bee condo to occupy a hole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Webweaver spun a web and then crawled into the mason bee condo to occupy a hole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of webweaving spider occupying space in the bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of webweaving spider occupying space in the bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of webweaving spider occupying space in the bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 9:29 PM
Tags: bee condo (4), leafcutter bees (4), mason bees (1), spider (22), webweaver (1)

Sticky Business

A garden spider spinning a web. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've ever watched spiders trap their prey in their sticky webs, you've probably wondered: "Why don't spiders stick to their own webs?" We've watched countless spiders trap honey bees, syrphid flies and other hapless critters in their webs. The...

A garden spider spinning a web. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A garden spider spinning a web. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A garden spider spinning a web. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Garden spider wrapping its prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Garden spider wrapping its prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Garden spider wrapping its prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2012 at 8:28 PM
Tags: EurekaAlert (1), Naturwissenschaften (1), spider (22), webs (2)

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