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From Beetles to Skeeters

Chris Barker

So, you want to become an entomologist... Entomologists, future entomologists and others interested in science are looking forward to the fall seminars sponsored Oct. 1 through Dec. 3 by the Department of Entomology, University of California,...

Chris Barker
Chris Barker

UC Davis mosquito researcher Chris Barker will speak on "Environmental Drivers of Large-Scale Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Mosquito Abundance and Virus Transmission in Californiaā€¯ on Nov. 26 from 12:10 to 1 p.m. in 122 Briggs, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2008 at 4:18 PM

It's All About the Bees

Newborn bee

It's all about the bees. When A. G. Kawamura, secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, and the newly selected State Apiary Board meet from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 3 at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research...

Newborn bee
Newborn bee

A newborn bee at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis. During the busy season, a worker bee will live only four to six weeks.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Examining bees
Examining bees

Concerned about bee health are (from left) UC Davis bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey; Yuba City beekeeper Valerie Severson of Yuba City; and UC Davis apiculturist Eric Mussen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, September 24, 2008 at 3:40 PM

Holy Moly!

Honey bee on sage

Quick! How long have insects inhabited this earth? If you're taking a biology or an entomology course, you'll be asked that question on an exam. If you're attending the Entomological Society of America conference Nov. 16-20 in Reno, you probably...

Honey bee on sage
Honey bee on sage

A honey bee on sage. Fossil evidence indicates that the very first insects inhabited this earth 400 million years ago. Honey bees existed at least by 7000 B.C., per a primitive drawing in a cave wall in eastern Spain. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 23, 2008 at 2:25 PM

Oh, Brother, Where Art Thou?

Drone takes off

It's tough being a drone honey bee this time of year. The drones, or male bees, don't survive the winter. Bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis  admits to having a soft spot for...

Drone takes off
Drone takes off

A drone (front) starts his takeoff to find a virgin queen. At left is a worker bee, his sister. Drones don't survive the winter; the girls kick the boys out of the hive.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 22, 2008 at 6:34 PM

Why the Stink Bug Stinks

Stink Bug

Ever wonder why the stink bug stinks? The stink bug, from the family Pentamodae, is a shield-shaped insect that tomato growers would love to ban from the face of this earth. Some 50 species exist in California. The adults are either brown or green....

Stink Bug
Stink Bug

A Consperse stink bug (Euschistus conspersus) races down a post at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis campus. Note its distinctive shield shape and its five-segmented antennae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 19, 2008 at 5:34 PM

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