UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Western tiger swallowtail

The Year 2017: 'Survival of the Flittest'

Have you ever seen a male long-horned bee (Melissodes agilis) doing a protective fly-by, trying to save a food source for the female of his species? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How would you describe the year 2017? Survival of the fittest? In the insect world, it's more like "survival of the flittest." If you've ever pulled up a chair in a pollinator garden and sat back and observed all the activity, sometimes it's like road...

Have you ever seen a male long-horned bee (Melissodes agilis) doing a protective fly-by, trying to save a food source for the female of his species? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Have you ever seen a male long-horned bee (Melissodes agilis) doing a protective fly-by, trying to save a food source for the female of his species? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a male long-horned bee (Melissodes agilis) doing a protective fly-by, trying to save a food source for the female of his species? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a male long-horned bee (Melissodes agilis) challenging a Western tiger swallowtail seeking nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)?(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Have you ever seen a male long-horned bee (Melissodes agilis) challenging a Western tiger swallowtail seeking nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)?(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a male long-horned bee (Melissodes agilis) challenging a Western tiger swallowtail seeking nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)?(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a Melissodes agilis targeting a Western tiger swallowtail? A tiger by the tail? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Have you ever seen a Melissodes agilis targeting a Western tiger swallowtail? A tiger by the tail? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a Melissodes agilis targeting a Western tiger swallowtail? A tiger by the tail? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a syrphid fly targeting a honeydew-laden lady beetle, aka ladybug, on a rose? This is an Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis) and a syrphid fly, a Scaeva pyrastri, according to Martin Hauser of the California Department of Food and Agriculture. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Have you ever seen a syrphid fly targeting a honeydew-laden lady beetle, aka ladybug, on a rose? This is an Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis) and a syrphid fly, a Scaeva pyrastri, according to Martin Hauser of the California Department of Food and Agriculture. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a syrphid fly targeting a honeydew-laden lady beetle, aka ladybug, on a rose? This is an Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis) and a syrphid fly, a Scaeva pyrastri, according to Martin Hauser of the California Department of Food and Agriculture. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a honey bee and bumble bee racing for the nectar on catmint (Nepeta)? The bumble bee is a Bombus melanopygus.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Have you ever seen a honey bee and bumble bee racing for the nectar on catmint (Nepeta)? The bumble bee is a Bombus melanopygus.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a honey bee and bumble bee racing for the nectar on catmint (Nepeta)? The bumble bee is a Bombus melanopygus.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, December 29, 2017 at 11:13 AM

A Tiger by the Tail

A longhorn bee, probably Melissodes agilis, has this

One of Buck Owens' signature songs that never failed to please his fan base was "I Got a Tiger by the Tail." The Country-Hall-of-Fame singer, who died in 2006 at age 76, said the lyrics came to him after he noticed a gas station sign advertising "Put a...

A longhorn bee, probably Melissodes agilis, has this
A longhorn bee, probably Melissodes agilis, has this "tiger" (Western tiger swallowtail) by the tail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A longhorn bee, probably Melissodes agilis, has this "tiger" (Western tiger swallowtail) by the tail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Territorial male longhorn bees are targeting a Western tiger swallowtail as it's trying to sip some nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Territorial male longhorn bees are targeting a Western tiger swallowtail as it's trying to sip some nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Territorial male longhorn bees are targeting a Western tiger swallowtail as it's trying to sip some nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This Western tiger swallowtail, targeted by male longhorn bees, takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This Western tiger swallowtail, targeted by male longhorn bees, takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This Western tiger swallowtail, targeted by male longhorn bees, takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at 4:22 PM

The Bee and the Tiger

A male longhorn bee, probably a Melisoddes agilis, targets a Western tiger swallowtail nectaring on Tithonia in Vacavile, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talk about a butterfly ballet... A large Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, with a wingspan of about four inches, flutters into the Vacaville, Calif. pollinator garden and lands on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). It proceeds to nectar, unaware...

A male longhorn bee, probably a Melisoddes agilis, targets a Western tiger swallowtail nectaring on Tithonia in Vacavile, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male longhorn bee, probably a Melisoddes agilis, targets a Western tiger swallowtail nectaring on Tithonia in Vacavile, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male longhorn bee, probably a Melisoddes agilis, targets a Western tiger swallowtail nectaring on Tithonia in Vacavile, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterfly ballet--The startled Western tiger swallowtail takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Butterfly ballet--The startled Western tiger swallowtail takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterfly ballet--The startled Western tiger swallowtail takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Western tiger swallowtail, interrupted by a male territorial longhorn bee, decides the Mexican sunflower is not
Western tiger swallowtail, interrupted by a male territorial longhorn bee, decides the Mexican sunflower is not "big enough for both of us." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Western tiger swallowtail, interrupted by a male territorial longhorn bee, decides the Mexican sunflower is not "big enough for both of us." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Persistent Western tiger swallowtail selects another blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Persistent Western tiger swallowtail selects another blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Persistent Western tiger swallowtail selects another blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 4:39 PM

Hurrah for the Red, White and Blue!

The red: The firecracker red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's the Fourth of July, and amid our celebration of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence 241 years ago on July 4, 1776 and our glorious nation, we celebrate the red, white and blue--the colors of our flag. But in the insect world, we can...

The red: The firecracker red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The red: The firecracker red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red: The firecracker red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The white: the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The white: the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The white: the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The blue: The blue spots in the tail of the Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The blue: The blue spots in the tail of the Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The blue: The blue spots in the tail of the Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, July 4, 2017 at 7:59 AM

The Flora and the Fauna at the Old State Capitol

A Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) spreads its wings on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Erected in 1852, this historic building was ostensibly intended for Benicia City Hall. Offered as the state capitol and promptly accepted, it had that honor from February 4, 1853 to February 25, 1854. Deeded to the state in 1951, it was one of the four...

A Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) spreads its wings on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) spreads its wings on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) spreads its wings on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritilliary (Agraulis vanillae) nectars on lantana on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritilliary (Agraulis vanillae) nectars on lantana on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritilliary (Agraulis vanillae) nectars on lantana on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pomegranate tree with double-blossoms graces the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol and draws honey bees and other insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pomegranate tree with double-blossoms graces the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol and draws honey bees and other insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pomegranate tree with double-blossoms graces the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol and draws honey bees and other insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Benicia City Hall building was built in 1852, and served as the state capitol from Feb. 4, 1853 to Feb. 25, 1854. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Benicia City Hall building was built in 1852, and served as the state capitol from Feb. 4, 1853 to Feb. 25, 1854. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Benicia City Hall building was build in 1852, and served as the state capitol from Feb. 4, 1853 to Feb. 25, 1854. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2017 at 4:29 PM

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