UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
University of California
UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: butterflies

Oh, the Butterflies You'll See at the Bohart During UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, holds some of the Morpho specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, the butterflies you'll see at the Bohart Museum of Entomology during the eighth annual UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day on Saturday, Feb. 16. Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) collection, says "I believe we...

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, holds some of the Morpho specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, holds some of the Morpho specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, holds some of the Morpho specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Blue morpho butterflies are among the
Blue morpho butterflies are among the "Wow" displays at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Blue morpho butterflies are among the "Wow" displays at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart Museum has five drawers of monarch butterfly specimens. Here curator Jeff Smith shows some of them. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Bohart Museum has five drawers of monarch butterfly specimens. Here curator Jeff Smith shows some of them. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart Museum has five drawers of monarch butterfly specimens. Here curator Jeff Smith shows some of them. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, February 11, 2019 at 3:43 PM

Treasured Memories of 2018: Bruce Hammock Honored--and His Noted Research All Began with a Caterpillar

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's noted research on chronic pain all began at UC Berkeley when he wondered how caterpillars turn into butterflies. In this photo: two Gulf Fritillary butterfly mating, while a caterpillar munches passionflower leaves in the background. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Looking back on 2018, Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor at the University of California, treasures the memories of the Hammock lab reunion, when 100 scientists from 10 different countries gathered to honor his work, reunite, collaborate and...

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's noted research on chronic pain all began at UC Berkeley when he wondered how caterpillars turn into butterflies. In this photo: two Gulf Fritillary butterfly mating, while a caterpillar munches passionflower leaves in the background. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's noted research on chronic pain all began at UC Berkeley when he wondered how caterpillars turn into butterflies. In this photo: two Gulf Fritillary butterfly mating, while a caterpillar munches passionflower leaves in the background. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's noted research on chronic pain all began at UC Berkeley when he wondered how caterpillars turn into butterflies. In this photo: two Gulf Fritillary butterfly mating, while a caterpillar munches passionflower leaves in the background. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bruce Hammock smiles as he receives accolades. In the back is his longtime friend Sarjeet Gill, distinguished professor at UC Riverside. They co-discovered an enzyme, epoxide hydrolase during their graduate studies at UC Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bruce Hammock smiles as he receives accolades. In the back is his longtime friend Sarjeet Gill, distinguished professor at UC Riverside. They co-discovered an enzyme, epoxide hydrolase during their graduate studies at UC Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bruce Hammock smiles as he receives accolades. In the back is his longtime friend Sarjeet Gill, distinguished professor at UC Riverside. They co-discovered an enzyme, epoxide hydrolase during their graduate studies at UC Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some 100 scientists (and their families) from 10 different countries converged on the UC Davis campus to honor their mentor, Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Some 100 scientists (and their families) from 10 different countries converged on the UC Davis campus to honor their mentor, Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some 100 scientists (and their families) from 10 different countries converged on the UC Davis campus to honor their mentor, Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oct. 19th Seminar at UC Davis: Do Butterflies Dream of Genetic Tattoos?

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Do butterflies dream of genetic tattoos? That's part of the creative title of a seminar that Arnaud Martin, assistant professor of biology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, will deliver next week to the UC Davis Department of Entomology and...

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)
Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Buy a Plant and the Pollinators Are Free!

An anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, sets the scene in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you head over to a nursery, and see bees and butterflies and other pollinators foraging on the plants, that's a good sign. Buy the plants. Promise: The pollinators will come. Many gardeners and would-be gardeners are looking forward to the UC...

An anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, sets the scene in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, sets the scene in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, sets the scene in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 5:11 PM

Red Passionflower Vine: Pretty But Poisonous?

A Gulf Fritillary foraging on a lavender passionflower vine, genus Passiflora. This is the Gulf Frits' host plant, they lay their eggs only on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If want to plant a passionflower vine (Passiflora)--the host plant of Gulf Fritillary butterflies (Agraulis vanillae)--in your garden, go for the species that produce lavender or purple flowers, "not the red ones." That's what we've been told for years....

A Gulf Fritillary foraging on a lavender passionflower vine, genus Passiflora. This is the Gulf Frits' host plant, they lay their eggs only on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary foraging on a lavender passionflower vine, genus Passiflora. This is the Gulf Frits' host plant, they lay their eggs only on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary foraging on a lavender passionflower vine, genus Passiflora. This is the Gulf Frits' host plant, they lay their eggs only on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries avoided this species of red passsionflower vine, Passiflora jamesonii, planted in the Garvey yard. Honey bees, however, did not. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries avoided this species of red passsionflower vine, Passiflora jamesonii, planted in the Garvey yard. Honey bees, however, did not. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries avoided this species of red passsionflower vine, Passiflora jamesonii, planted in the Garvey yard. Honey bees, however, did not. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 4, 2018 at 5:01 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

First storyPrevious 5 stories  |  Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu