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Posts Tagged: Berkeley

Black Friday: Bumble Bees and Blackberries

A bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on a blackberry blossom in Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Black Friday" means different things to each of us, but when I think of "Black Friday," I think of black bumble bees nectaring on blackberry blossoms in Berkeley. Bumble bees on blackberry blossoms in Berkeley. Talk about alliteration! Specifically, I...

A bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on a blackberry blossom in Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on a blackberry blossom in Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on a blackberry blossom in Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Taking flight, the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, seeks another blackberry blossom in Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Taking flight, the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, seeks another blackberry blossom in Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Taking flight, the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, seeks another blackberry blossom in Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, November 23, 2018 at 8:00 AM

The Unpredictable Monarchs

A male (left) and female monarch on a scarlet milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You never know what they will do. When you release newly emerged monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus), some linger in the comfort of your hand. Some soar high into the sky. Some flutter to a nearby bush or tree.  When we released two newly...

A male (left) and female monarch on a scarlet milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male (left) and female monarch on a scarlet milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male (left) and female monarch on a scarlet milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female monarch (right) moves toward the male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female monarch (right) moves toward the male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female monarch (right) moves toward the male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two monarchs meet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two monarchs meet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two monarchs meet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 at 2:18 PM

An Art Car Perfect for an Entomologist

An stylized ant on the art car. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ever been to the Burning Man Festival and checked out the art cars? No, and no. But last Sunday at the Berkeley Marina, we saw an art car that looked as if it could have been at the Burning Man. It was the wheel deal. And a car that an entomologist...

An stylized ant on the art car. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An stylized ant on the art car. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An stylized ant on the art car. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time will tell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time will tell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time will tell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Art car  holds many treasures. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Art car holds many treasures. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Art car holds many treasures. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The end. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 30, 2014 at 10:08 PM
Tags: art car (1), Berkeley (5), entomologist (5)

Obesity researchers leave no molecule unturned

Obesity research plotted onto an illustration of the human digestive system.

The biennial Childhood Obesity Conference is taking place in Long Beach June 18-20. Book-ended by two world-class keynote speakers Michael Moss, the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter and author of Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us, and Marion Nestle, a New York University professor of food studies and public health, and author of Food Politics and What to Eat — the event promises a no-holds-barred, systemic look at the problems of obesity in all their complexity.

Public outreach on the part of dynamic writers and activists like Moss and Nestle is critical and gets much-needed information, messages, and questions out in the world. But the hard science, where many of the breakthroughs will take place that will advance understanding and treatments, is hidden in laboratories across UC, where faculty and their graduate students and post-doctoral researchers toil away in obscurity.

One such discovery broke out of the lab and into the news just in time for this past holiday season, when UC Berkeley molecular toxicology professor Hei Sook Sol published a paper unlocking the molecular mechanisms of how our bodies convert dietary carbohydrates into fat. The finding has the potential to be an early step in development of treatment for fatty liver and other obesity-related diseases.

For sneak peak at where the next breakthrough might come from, browse the research currently taking place at in the Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology at UC Berkeley.

Posted on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 at 1:33 PM
  • Author: Ann Brody Guy
Tags: Berkeley (5), Hei Sook Sul (1), obesity (26), obesity research (1)

A She-Bee on the Hebe

Queen bumble bee nectaring a hebe at the Berkeley marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, is back. We spotted some overwintering queen bumble bees gathering nectar on a hebe bush last Sunday at the Berkeley marina. Distinguished by their yellow faces, yellow head pile, black wings, and...

Queen bumble bee nectaring a hebe at the Berkeley marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Queen bumble bee nectaring a hebe at the Berkeley marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen bumble bee nectaring a hebe at the Berkeley marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen bumble bee is aglow in the afternoon sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Queen bumble bee is aglow in the afternoon sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen bumble bee is aglow in the afternoon sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Distinguishing yellow stripe on the lower abdomen is barely visible. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Distinguishing yellow stripe on the lower abdomen is barely visible. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Distinguishing yellow stripe on the lower abdomen is barely visible. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 10:27 PM
 
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