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Posts Tagged: Bohart Museum of Entomology

UC Davis Picnic Day Going Virtual--With Insects, Too!

Let the races begin! A scene from the 2019 UC Davis Picnic Day cockroach races. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's just not a picnic without insects. And when the 107th annual UC Davis Picnic Day goes virtual on Saturday, April 17, the insects will go virtual, too. The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology and the Bohart Museum...

Let the races begin! A scene from the 2019 UC Davis Picnic Day cockroach races. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Let the races begin! A scene from the 2019 UC Davis Picnic Day cockroach races. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let the races begin! A scene from the 2019 UC Davis Picnic Day cockroach races. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows a display of monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows a display of monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows a display of monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 6, 2021 at 2:16 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation

Hello, Spring! Welcome, Western Tiger Swallowtail

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hello, spring! It's not "officially" spring until we see--and photograph--the spectacular Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. One landed March 30 on an aromatic white lilac bush in Alamo Creek Park, Vacaville. It lingered long enough for a few...

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 2, 2021 at 4:17 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

About Those Urban Myths in Entomology

It's an urban myth that

Professor Lynn Kimsey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology and director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, knows her insects and she knows the urban myths associated with them. As director of the Bohart...

It's an urban myth that
It's an urban myth that "Female mantids always eat males they mate with." Lynn Kimsey's response: "Only if the male isn't fast enough." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's an urban myth that "Female mantids always eat males they mate with." Lynn Kimsey's response: "Only if the male isn't fast enough." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Urban myth:
Urban myth: "Butterflies and moths can't fly if you rub the scales off their wings." Says Lynn Kimsey: "Not true, they can fly." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Urban myth: "Butterflies and moths can't fly if you rub the scales off their wings." Says Lynn Kimsey: "Not true, they can fly." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2021 at 4:32 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Happy Taxonomists' Appreciation Day!

Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and UC Davis professor of entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you hugged your taxonomist yet today? No? Probably can't due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but at least we can honor them every March 19 on Taxonomists' Appreciation Day. Basically, taxonomy is the science of describing, naming, defining and...

Bombus californicus heads for a purple coneflower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bombus californicus heads for a purple coneflower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus californicus heads for a purple coneflower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 19, 2021 at 4:27 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Perseverance Prevailed

A winter monarch caterpillar munching on the remnants of milkweed on Jan. 23 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Perseverance prevailed. The third instar monarch caterpillar we found munching on the remnants of our cut-back milkweed on Jan. 23 in Vacaville, Calif., is now an adult butterfly fluttering around the neighborhood. We brought the caterpillar in...

A winter monarch caterpillar munching on the remnants of milkweed on Jan. 23 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A winter monarch caterpillar munching on the remnants of milkweed on Jan. 23 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A winter monarch caterpillar munching on the remnants of milkweed on Jan. 23 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The caterpillar is about to
The caterpillar is about to "J" and pupate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The caterpillar is about to "J" and pupate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's almost a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's almost a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's almost a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The formation of the chrysalis is complete. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The formation of the chrysalis is complete. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The formation of the chrysalis is complete. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The iconic monarch wings are visible through the translucent chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The iconic monarch wings are visible through the translucent chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The iconic monarch wings are visible through the translucent chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

New life! A monarch butterfly, a male, drying its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
New life! A monarch butterfly, a male, drying its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

New life! A monarch butterfly, a male, drying its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male monarch spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male monarch spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male monarch spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to lift off! Shortly after this image was taken, the male monarch fluttered away. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready to lift off! Shortly after this image was taken, the male monarch fluttered away. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to lift off! Shortly after this image was taken, the male monarch fluttered away. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 1, 2021 at 4:26 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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