UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Cole Crops

Weeds serving as alternative hosts for diamondback moth

Fig. 1. Diamondback caterpillar spotted on a secondary branch of a brassica weed by the side of Blackie Road, Castroville, CA. Photo by E. Garcia.

Diamondback moth (DBM) is a persistent pest in the Salinas-Castroville area. We were able to find late instar caterpillars in several spots along Blackie road on Tuesday, January 22nd. Basically, these caterpillars were feeding on brassica weeds, located...

Posted on Sunday, January 27, 2019 at 7:00 AM
Tags: Cole Crops (3), Diamondback moth (1), Weeds (64)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture Pest Management

The Predator and the Pest

Breakfast! A hungry praying mantis eyes a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So here's this praying mantis perched on top of a prickly pear cactus. It's early morning and she's hungry. A cabbage white butterfly, looking like a white-gowned princess in a medieval palace, flutters by and pauses on the prickly pear to seek some...

Breakfast! A hungry praying mantis eyes a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Breakfast! A hungry praying mantis eyes a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Breakfast! A hungry praying mantis eyes a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

With a lightning strike, the praying mantis grasps the cabbage white butterfly with its spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
With a lightning strike, the praying mantis grasps the cabbage white butterfly with its spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

With a lightning strike, the praying mantis grasps the cabbage white butterfly with its spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Holding it up like a trophy, the praying mantis begins to eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Holding it up like a trophy, the praying mantis begins to eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Holding it up like a trophy, the praying mantis begins to eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis concentrates on breakfast.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis concentrates on breakfast. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis concentrates on breakfast. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Finished! Breakfast is over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Finished! Breakfast is over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Finished! Breakfast is over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 3, 2016 at 5:42 PM

Cabbage White Butterfly Not So Bad?

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's the butterfly we're supposed to hate. That would be the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. Its larvae or cabbageworms are pests of our cole crops, including cabbage, kale and mustard. Pests? You bet. According to the UC Statewide...

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The larvae of the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, are considered pests of cole crops, but we should be thanking them for giving us the pungent taste of wasabi and mustard, scientists say. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The larvae of the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, are considered pests of cole crops, but we should be thanking them for giving us the pungent taste of wasabi and mustard, scientists say. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The larvae of the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, are considered pests of cole crops, but we should be thanking them for giving us the pungent taste of wasabi and mustard, scientists say. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 at 9:16 PM
 
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