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Posts Tagged: Jerry Powell

Plume Moth Fit to a 'T'

In some respects, the pterophorid plume moth is fit to a 'T.'

"The T-square shape is classic," says butterfly expert Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology at the University of California, Davis.

"They always sit with their wings stuck out to the side like that," says Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology at UC Davis.

At rest, the plume moth (famlly Pterophoridae) holds its slender wings at right angles to body, giving it a T-shaped profile.

In his book, California Insect, UC Berkeley entomologist Jerry Powell explains why they're called plume moths..."because the forewings are deeply notched and the hindwings are divided into three linear parts, each with long scale fringes. When perched, the insects roll the forewings around the folded hindwing plumes, resulting in peculiar sticklike or craneflylike appearance, unlike any other moth."

Most are noctural and are attracted to lights, Powell adds.

Scientists report some 159 described species in North America alone and more than 30 in California.

In their larval stages, some plume moths are beneficial as biological control agents. And some are pests, such as the artichoke plume moth,  the geranium plume moth and the snapdragon plume moth.

When you see them resting on a plant, however, the adults look a little like those wind turbines that stretch out in the hills of Rio Vista, Solano County.

The plume moth is tiny. It's shown here on the finger of native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The plume moth is tiny. It's shown here on the finger of native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The plume moth is tiny. It's shown here on the finger of native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The plume moth at rest resembles a wind turbine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The plume moth at rest resembles a wind turbine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The plume moth at rest resembles a wind turbine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at 9:11 PM

Supporting the Bohart Museum

If you're looking for a cause to support, consider the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis.

The museum crew, led by director Lynn Kimsey, professor of entomology at UC Davis, is enthusiastic, knowledgeable, and dedicated.

They have gained a state, national and international reputation as a key source of information. The museum houses nearly eight million insect specimens, collected from all over the world.  In addition to the insect specimens, they maintain a "live" petting zoo that includes Madagascar hissing cockroaches, walking sticks, praying mantids and tarantulas. A year-around gift shop is stocked with t-shirts, sweatshirts, jewelry, books, posters, insect nets, butterfly habitats, and insect-themed candy.

"Every year we have new insect adventures and those head-slapping moments when you think 'insects do that, really?'" Kimsey wrote in a recent letter, adding that  "2013 has been a very active year, with our staff and students strengthening our efforts to provide services and educational programs to the public. We are very proud of our dedicated group of volunteers and staff who bring insect-based programs to schools and public functions throughout northern California."

As in the past, long-time supporters Marius and Joanne Wasbauer have given the Bohart Museum another challenge grant of $5000. "They hope that their gift will inspire others to give and they will match your gift, one-for-one, up to $5000," Kimsey wrote. "Funds from the campaign will be deposited in the museum endowment, which provides invaluable operating support to the museum, its collections, programs and staff."

Folks can donate online at http://www.bohartmuseum.com.

Folks can also sign up for a sponsorship of $2500 to be eligible to participate in the Bohart's BioLegay program and will be able to name one of the new species listed on the BioLegacy website, http://biolegacy.ucdavis.edu. This contribution could also be counted toward the Wasbauer challenge grant. 

The insect museum is located in Room 1124 of the Academic Surge building on Crocker Lane, near the LaRue Road intersection. It's open to the public Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 5 p.m. Special weekend hours are also offered, as are group tours. Contact Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator, at  tabyang@ucdavis.edu for more information.

Noted entomologist Jerry Powell, director emeritus of the Essig Museum of Entomology, UC Berkeley, volunteers at the Bohart Museum.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Noted entomologist Jerry Powell, director emeritus of the Essig Museum of Entomology, UC Berkeley, volunteers at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Noted entomologist Jerry Powell, director emeritus of the Essig Museum of Entomology, UC Berkeley, volunteers at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jerry Powell selects a specimen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jerry Powell selects a specimen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jerry Powell selects a specimen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ethan Wells, 7, of the Woodland Montessori School, delights in an Australian walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ethan Wells, 7, of the Woodland Montessori School, delights in an Australian walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ethan Wells, 7, of the Woodland Montessori School, delights in an Australian walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hands reach out to touch the Australian walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hands reach out to touch the Australian walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hands reach out to touch the Australian walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, December 11, 2013 at 10:38 PM

Luck Be a Lady

Photographers never tire of capturing images of ladybugs, aka lady beetles.

First of all, they're beneficial insects. You know when you photograph them that they're about to scoot, crawl or fly off to grab a tasty lunch--an all-you-can-eat aphid buffet.

Second, they're colorful. They brighten a garden, standing out like red Corvettes on a freeway. 

Third, they're among the most recognizable of insects. Halloween costume companies relish in creating polka-dotted attire for the 5-and-under set. Nobody will ask "What are you supposed to be?" 

Fourth, they're quite common. California alone has some 125 species of Coccinellids.
Worldwide, there are some 5000 described species.

Not too many people know, however, that many species in the family Coccinellidae secrete a nasty fluid. As UC Berkeley retired entomologist Jerry Powell writes in his book, California Insects, "...when disturbed, many species secrete a bitter, amber-colored fluid that is believed to have poisonous effects on vertebrates..."

Indeed, their red and black coloring warns "Leave me alone!"

Ladybug, aka lady beetle, searching for aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ladybug, aka lady beetle, searching for aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ladybug, aka lady beetle, searching for aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The ladybug's coloring warns
The ladybug's coloring warns "Leave me alone!" (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The ladybug's coloring warns "Leave me alone!" (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A ladybug on the prowl. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A ladybug on the prowl. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A ladybug on the prowl. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 21, 2011 at 9:15 PM

Collembola!

Collembola! Watch the springtails spring!

Over the last several days, Art Shapiro, professor of evolution and ecology at the University of Caifornia, Davis, has patrolled a UC Davis sidewalk checking out a huge volume of springtails.

"Literally millions of little buff-colored springtails," he related Monday, "have been swarming for the past three days on the sidewalk and adjacent strip under the oak trees on the east side of Howard Way, about halfway between the parking garage and Russell Boulevard, mostly around 7 to 8 a.m. and after 5 p.m. I've never seen such numbers, except for the snow springtails in winter in upstate New York."

I trekked over to Howard Way at 7 a.m. today and it took awhile to find these little buff-colored organisms. That's because they're oh, so tiny! They're less than six millimeters long--that's 0.24 inches in length. And they move fast.

Obviously, Art Shapiro has the eyes of an eagle. I don't.

Springtails (order Collembola) are those primitive, wingless six-legged critters you find in soil, leaf litter, decaying wood and other damp places.  Basically, they're known for working the soil. However, some springtails, such as Sminthurus viridis, are agricultural crop pests.

Why are they called springtails? Retired UC Berkeley entomologist Jerry Powell writes in California Insects (a University of California Press book co-authored by entomologist Charles Hogue): "Most springtails are readily recognizable by a forked, tail-like appendage (furcula) which arises toward the rear of the abdomen and which the insect snaps against the substratum, springing itself into the air."

California has about 130 species that spring themselves into the air.

Frankly, it's a wonder anyone can see them, springing or not springing.

A springtail (look to the right of
A springtail (look to the right of "of") next to a penny. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A springtail (look to the right of "of the") next to a penny. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The springtail is less than 6 millimeters long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The springtail is less than 6 millimeters long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The springtail is less than 6 millimeters long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Site of the springtail sightings on Howard Way, looking toward Russell Boulevard on UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Site of the springtail sightings on Howard Way, looking toward Russell Boulevard on UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Site of the springtail sightings on Howard Way, looking toward Russell Boulevard on UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 18, 2011 at 7:56 PM

Forceps, Please

Forceps, please!

Have you ever stopped to admire a blossom and seen forceps protruding?

Earwig!

We were walking near Mrak Hall, UC Davis, on a hot summery afternoon and spotted a tell-tale sign: abdominal forceps, aka pinchers or pincers.

Earwig!

We unfolded the blossom and an earwig crawled out. "Female earwig," said Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology at UC Davis. "Young female earwig."

In a male earwig, the forceps are more widely spaced.

The most abundant earwig in California is the European eartwig, Forficula auricularia (family Forficulidae), according to entomologists Jerry Powell and Charles Hogue in their book, California Insects. However, it was not known in the state until 1923. 

They describe the adult as about 12 to 22mm long, mostly brown with pale forewings and antennae. "The immatures and adults feed on a wide variety of substances, from flowers and green foliage near the ground to living and dead insects, including aphids."

This one seemed to be escaping from the heat.

Tell-tale sign of an earwig. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tell-tale sign of an earwig. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tell-tale sign of an earwig. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Earwig exposed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Earwig exposed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Earwig exposed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 27, 2011 at 8:34 PM
Tags: Charles Hogue (1), earwig (1), Jerry Powell (7), Lynn Kimsey (3)

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