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Posts Tagged: Libellula saturata

My Old Flame: Looking for Love or a Fast-Food Snack or a Little Sun

A male flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Looking for love...or a fast-food snack...or a little sun... A male flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, is a sight to see. The males are fire-engine red or firecracker red, and when they perch on a bamboo stake in your pollinator garden,...

A male flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The flameskimmer's wings shimmer in the morning light. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The flameskimmer's wings shimmer in the morning light. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The flameskimmer's wings shimmer in the morning light. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, May 15, 2019 at 5:33 PM

Portrait of My Old Flame

A flame skimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just call it "my old flame." Well, it's not mine, but it is a flame of sorts, a flame skimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) and it's firecracker red. We see this species frequenting our pollinator garden in Vacaville, which includes a fish pond,...

A flame skimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A flame skimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flame skimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 8, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Yard & Garden

Fire and Fury in a Pollinator Garden

A male flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just call it "Fire and Fury in a Pollinator Garden." That would be the firecracker red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata. They fly into our pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif., attracted by the lily-padded pond and the all-you-can-eat...

A male flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, about to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, about to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, about to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A brisk breeze stirs the wings of a flameskimmer dragonfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A brisk breeze stirs the wings of a flameskimmer dragonfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A brisk breeze stirs the wings of a flameskimmer dragonfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 21, 2018 at 4:16 PM

Dragonfly vs. Bee: Catch of the Day

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her  prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) waits oh-so-patiently atop a bamboo stick at the edge of the pollinator garden. She's in Vacaville, Calif., and the garden she is visiting today is a veritable oasis of blooms: Mexican sunflower...

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her  prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) with her prey, a female sweat bee, Halictus ligatus, as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. The gender of the flamekimmer identified by Kathy Claypool Biggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red flameskimmer dragonfly adjusts her prey, a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The red flameskimmer dragonfly adjusts her prey, a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red flameskimmer dragonfly adjusts her prey, a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beneath all of that pollen is a female sweat bee, the prey of this red flameskimmer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beneath all of that pollen is a female sweat bee, the prey of this red flameskimmer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beneath all of that pollen is a female sweat bee, the prey of this red flameskimmer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All gone. The red flameskimmer polishes off the last of the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All gone. The red flameskimmer polishes off the last of the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All gone. The red flameskimmer polishes off the last of the sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 5, 2017 at 4:34 PM

Hurrah for the Red, White and Blue!

The red: The firecracker red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's the Fourth of July, and amid our celebration of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence 241 years ago on July 4, 1776 and our glorious nation, we celebrate the red, white and blue--the colors of our flag. But in the insect world, we can...

The red: The firecracker red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The red: The firecracker red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The red: The firecracker red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The white: the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The white: the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The white: the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The blue: The blue spots in the tail of the Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The blue: The blue spots in the tail of the Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The blue: The blue spots in the tail of the Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, July 4, 2017 at 7:59 AM

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