UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Tomatoes

Top 5 Tomato Plant Problems Solved!

Tomatoes are popular in home gardens. (Pixabay)

Tomatoes are so popular with home gardeners, that a 2014 study by the National Gardening Association showed that 86 percent of homes with vegetable gardens grow tomatoes! It's understandable that the tomato plant is a popular home vegetable garden...

Posted on Friday, June 23, 2017 at 9:28 AM
Tags: blossom end rot (2), catfacing (2), cracks (2), green shoulders (2), leaf roll (2), solar yellowing (1), sunburn (2), tomatoes (11), UC IPM (225)

Solutions to Top 5 Tomato Plant Problems

Tomato leaf roll. [R. Wallace agrilife.org]

From the UC Master Gardener Statewide Blog The tomato is one of the most versatile and rewarding plants to grow in a summer edible garden. According to a 2014 study by the National Gardening Association, 86 percent of homes with vegetable gardens grow...

Posted on Friday, July 15, 2016 at 3:23 PM
Tags: blossom end rot (2), catfacing (2), cracks (2), green shoulders (2), leaf curl (3), leaf roll (2), Master Gardeners (12), snowden (1), sunburn (2), sunscald (1), tomato (4), tomatoes (11), UCIPM (66), yellowing (1)

Leaffooted Plant Bug

Adult leaffooted bugs. [D.R. Haviland]

If you've noticed some odd-looking bugs in your garden or landscape recently, you might have leaffooted bugs. These medium to large sized insects feed on certain fruits, fruiting vegetables, nuts and ornamental plants. Life Cycle Adult females can lay...

Posted on Friday, June 17, 2016 at 9:29 AM
Tags: assassin (2), bug (6), citrus (30), leaffooted (4), pest (75), Pomegranates (9), Tomatoes (11), UCIPM (66)

UC Davis tomatoes provide year-round healthful eating for college students

Chef Bob Walden, right, and Arnulfo Herrera, a cook, show off roasted tomatoes at UC Davis. (photo: Gregory Urquiaga / UC Davis)
Today's dorm food is far superior to the tasteless, over-processed foods of decades past. No more mystery meat or mushy vegetables. Campus dining services across the country are providing a diversity of fresher and healthier foods, much to the delight of food-savvy students who want variety, flavor, and nutritious choices. Well... being students, they don't always make the healthiest choices, but educational programs at campus dorms are turning the tide toward more-healthful eating.

At the same time, chefs and food buyers at universities, particularly the University of California, are selecting for high-quality fruits and vegetables, produced locally and sustainably. Universities with strong food sustainability programs are rightfully proud of what they're doing to educate students about food production, health, and nutrition. UC Davis Dining Services prioritizes the purchase of locally grown food (ideally within a 50-mile radius of campus). Most University of California campuses have similar programs.

At UC Davis, fresh roma tomatoes are picked each August from the 300-acre Russell Ranch, part of the campus's Agricultural Sustainability Institute, then processed within hours by campus Dining Services to provide year-round tomato sauce for pizza, pasta, and ratatouille. All told, 10,000 pounds of tomatoes are processed during a two-week period in August. About 29 percent of the total food served in the campus's residential dining halls is from local, organic or sustainable sources.

(courtesy photo: UC Davis Agricultural Sustainability Institute)
The tomatoes grown at Russell Ranch are part of a long-term academic research project that examines factors such as farming methods, irrigation needs, crop rotations, yield, and nutritional content. At the end of the growing season, some of the many tons of tomatoes are purchased by Dining Services at market value.

Emma Torbert, an academic coordinator at the UC Davis Agricultural Sustainability Institute, noted, “Connecting the food system to the research is really interesting. A lot of times there is confusion about where our food is coming from. The more people are educated, the more educated decisions they can make.”

Many UC Davis faculty and staff are so impressed with the food choices at the dorms that they purchase individual meal tickets and enjoy lunches made with the campus-grown tomatoes, herbs, and other vegetables, all of which are part of the daily food array. Public dinners are also offered periodically at the dorms so that community members can sit amongst students to taste and learn about the sustainability programs in the dorms.

Additional Information:

  • Video: Farm to Table, UC Davis Tomatoes; 2010
  • Slide show of this year's UC Davis tomato harvesting and processing system; 2014
  • Sustainable Foodservice Progress Report 2014, UC Davis Dining Services
  • Two videos of UC Davis students who work at the Student Farm to produce food, including one on tomato sauce production
  • “Tomatoes: Safe methods to store, preserve, and enjoy.” UC Agriculture and Natural Resources, free publication
Posted on Wednesday, August 27, 2014 at 11:11 AM

Herbicide resistance top issue for farmers, researchers

UC Davis weed scientist Lynn Sosnoskie prepares bindweed plants for herbicide research

Here's an article by Todd Fitchette| Western Farm Press | July 17, 2014   Weed resistance issues are nothing new for university researchers and the farmers they advise. Nevertheless, science continues to partner with agriculture to find ways to...

Posted on Monday, July 21, 2014 at 11:29 AM

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