UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: UC Davis

A Gray Streak on the Fava Beans

A gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, on fava beans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Seen any gray hairstreaks, lately? No, not on someone's head. This is the butterfly, Strymon melilnus, from the Lycaenidae family, known as the gossamer-winged butterflies. It's an ashy gray butterfly with a white border. You'll also see orange spots...

A gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, on fava beans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, on fava beans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, on fava beans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 9, 2021 at 6:32 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Health, Yard & Garden

Priya Rajarapu: 'Insect-Plant Molecular Interactions: Stories from Invasive Insects to Disease Vectors'

An illustration from Priya Rajarapu's seminar: Top image, Emerald ash borer; lower left, a black-faced leafhopper; and at right, thrips.

April showers bring June flowers, but spring also brings seminars about insects.   Insect physiologist Swapna Priya Rajarapu, a postdoctoral research scholar in the Dorith Rotenberg laboratory at North Carolina State...

An illustration from Priya Rajarapu's seminar: Top image, Emerald ash borer; lower left, a black-faced leafhopper; and at right, thrips.
An illustration from Priya Rajarapu's seminar: Top image, Emerald ash borer; lower left, a black-faced leafhopper; and at right, thrips.

An illustration from Priya Rajarapu's seminar: Top image, Emerald ash borer; lower left, a black-faced leafhopper; and at right, thrips.

Posted on Thursday, April 8, 2021 at 7:18 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

UC Davis Picnic Day Going Virtual--With Insects, Too!

Let the races begin! A scene from the 2019 UC Davis Picnic Day cockroach races. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's just not a picnic without insects. And when the 107th annual UC Davis Picnic Day goes virtual on Saturday, April 17, the insects will go virtual, too. The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology and the Bohart Museum...

Let the races begin! A scene from the 2019 UC Davis Picnic Day cockroach races. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Let the races begin! A scene from the 2019 UC Davis Picnic Day cockroach races. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let the races begin! A scene from the 2019 UC Davis Picnic Day cockroach races. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows a display of monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows a display of monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows a display of monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 6, 2021 at 2:16 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation

The Bees-Ness of the Bees

Around 6 p.m., April 1, the bee swarm at the Starner home looked like this. (Photo by the Craig and Shelly Hunt family)

The bee swarm touched down April 1, settling near the wind chimes on her patio roof. "I saw the swarm when I looked out the window," said Vacaville resident Lynn Starner.  She watched dozens of bees buzzing toward the...

Around 6 p.m., April 1, the bee swarm at the Starner home looked like this. (Photo by the Craig and Shelly Hunt family)
Around 6 p.m., April 1, the bee swarm at the Starner home looked like this. (Photo by the Craig and Shelly Hunt family)

Around 6 p.m., April 1, the bee swarm at the Starner home looked like this. (Photo by the Craig and Shelly Hunt family)

Beekeeper Craig Hunt (on ladder) and his daughter, Emma, 8, work to retrieve the bee swarm. Emma learned beekeeping from her father, who taught 4-H beekeeping prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Shelly Hunt Photo)
Beekeeper Craig Hunt (on ladder) and his daughter, Emma, 8, work to retrieve the bee swarm. Emma learned beekeeping from her father, who taught 4-H beekeeping prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Shelly Hunt Photo)

Beekeeper Craig Hunt (on ladder) and his daughter, Emma, 8, work to retrieve the bee swarm. Emma learned beekeeping from her father, who taught 4-H beekeeping prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Shelly Hunt Photo)

Close-up of Craig Hunt smoking the bees. (Photo by Shelly Hunt)
Close-up of Craig Hunt smoking the bees. (Photo by Shelly Hunt)

Close-up of Craig Hunt smoking the bees. (Photo by Shelly Hunt)

Beekeeper Emma Hunt, 8, tends to the bees. (Photo by Shelly Hunt)
Beekeeper Emma Hunt, 8, tends to the bees. (Photo by Shelly Hunt)

Beekeeper Emma Hunt, 8, tends to the bees. (Photo by Shelly Hunt)

Bees in a box! The Vacaville patio swarm yielded two boxes. (Craig and Shelly Hunt Photo)
Bees in a box! The Vacaville patio swarm yielded two boxes. (Craig and Shelly Hunt Photo)

Bees in a box! The Vacaville patio swarm yielded two boxes. (Craig and Shelly Hunt Photo)

Posted on Monday, April 5, 2021 at 3:47 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Hello, Spring! Welcome, Western Tiger Swallowtail

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hello, spring! It's not "officially" spring until we see--and photograph--the spectacular Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. One landed March 30 on an aromatic white lilac bush in Alamo Creek Park, Vacaville. It lingered long enough for a few...

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 2, 2021 at 4:17 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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