UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Washington State University

Winter Monarchs: Thankfully, They're Out There

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thankfully, they're out there. Butterfly guru Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, spotted a female monarch butterfly at 1:35 today. As he mentioned in his email: "So, at 1:25 p.m. a female monarch flew directly...

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.
This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.

This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.

Posted on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 at 4:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The King of the Butterflies on the Queen of Annuals

A monarch butterfly sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in Vacaville, Calif., on Oct. 30. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is there anything more beautiful than a monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, nectaring on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia) in the late afternoon sun?  The brilliant orange and black butterfly, famous not only for its...

A monarch butterfly sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in Vacaville, Calif., on Oct. 30. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in Vacaville, Calif., on Oct. 30. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in Vacaville, Calif., on Oct. 30. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly spreads its wings on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in Vacaville, Calif., on Oct. 30. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly spreads its wings on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in Vacaville, Calif., on Oct. 30. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly spreads its wings on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in Vacaville, Calif., on Oct. 30. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As striking as a stain glass window, the monarch takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
As striking as a stain glass window, the monarch takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As striking as a stain glass window, the monarch takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, November 6, 2020 at 3:42 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

A 'Very Poor Year' for Monarchs in Pacific Northwest

This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to  285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's been a "very poor year" for monarch butterflies in the Pacific Northwest. So, folks, if you're in their migratory pathway and anticipate seeing them head toward their overwintering sites in coastal California, don't get your hopes...

This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to  285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to 285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This migrating monarch flew from a vineyard in Ashland, Ore. to a garden in Vacaville, Calif. in 2016. This amounted to 285 miles in seven days or about 40.7 miles per day, according to WSU entomologist David James, who studies migratory monarchs.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tattered and torn migrating monarch in Vacaville, Calif. This image was taken in 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A tattered and torn migrating monarch in Vacaville, Calif. This image was taken in 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tattered and torn migrating monarch in Vacaville, Calif. This image was taken in 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed female monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 14, 2020 at 2:12 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Elizabeth Frost, The Bees, and The Fires

Boone Vale, a volunteer with the Bodega Bay Fire Department, took this heartbreaking image of a fire reaching the Pope Valley hives of Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Valley Queens. Yelle  credits him for saving some of her hives. (Photo by Boone Vale, used with permission)

The wildfires that raged through California, crippling and/or destroying beekeepers' homes and their livelihoods are heartbreaking. One victim, Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens (PCQ), located on 8307 Quail Canyon Road, Vacaville, ...

Boone Vale, a volunteer with the Bodega Bay Fire Department, took this heartbreaking image of a fire reaching the Pope Valley hives of Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Valley Queens. Yelle  credits him for saving some of her hives. (Photo by Boone Vale, used with permission)
Boone Vale, a volunteer with the Bodega Bay Fire Department, took this heartbreaking image of a fire reaching the Pope Valley hives of Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Valley Queens. Yelle credits him for saving some of her hives. (Photo by Boone Vale, used with permission)

Boone Vale, a volunteer with the Bodega Bay Fire Department, took this heartbreaking image of a fire reaching the Pope Valley hives of Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Valley Queens. Yelle credits him for saving some of her hives. (Photo by Boone Vale, used with permission)

UC Davis alumnus Elizabeth
UC Davis alumnus Elizabeth "Liz" Frost (foreground), employed with the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, transferring nucs in a holding yard. (Photo courtesy of Liz Frost)

UC Davis alumnus Elizabeth "Liz" Frost (foreground), employed with the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, transferring nucs in a holding yard. (Photo courtesy of Liz Frost)

UC Davis alumnus Elizabeth
UC Davis alumnus Elizabeth "Liz" Frost worked at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis alumnus Elizabeth "Liz" Frost worked at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 4, 2020 at 2:37 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources

What You Need to Know About That Invasive Giant Hornet

This is a female Vespa mandarinia japonica by Yasunori Koide. (Creative Commons photo)

It's good to see Washington State University Extension's newly published, updated fact sheet on the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia. You can view or download it here for free. Remember the massive media frenzy earlier this year when "the...

This is a female Vespa mandarinia japonica by Yasunori Koide. (Creative Commons photo)
This is a female Vespa mandarinia japonica by Yasunori Koide. (Creative Commons photo)

This is a female Vespa mandarinia japonica by Yasunori Koide. (Creative Commons photo)

Screen shot of the life cycle that appears in the WSU Extension fact sheet on the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia. (Courtesy of WSU)
Screen shot of the life cycle that appears in the WSU Extension fact sheet on the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia. (Courtesy of WSU)

Screen shot of the life cycle that appears in the WSU Extension fact sheet on the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia. (Courtesy of WSU)

Posted on Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 2:13 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Health, Innovation, Pest Management

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