UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: apricot

Fruit Tree Monitoring for Pests

Purplish, scabby spots on apricot fruit and holes in leaves caused by shot hole disease. (Credit: Jack Kelly Clark)

Stone fruit trees like apricot, cherry, nectarine, peach, plum, and prune are a staple of many backyard gardens and landscapes. Unfortunately, there are a variety of pests that can weaken trees and spoil fruit. Caring for trees correctly and monitoring...

Posted on Monday, May 7, 2018 at 1:43 PM
Tags: apricot (4), brown rot (2), cherry (6), eutypa dieback (2), monitor (3), nectarine (6), peach (3), peach leaf curl (6), pest (75), plum (3), prune (4), shot hole disease (1), spotted wing drosophila (4), UC IPM (225)
Focus Area Tags: Pest Management Yard & Garden

Pruning Trees in Winter

Pruning a tree. (Photo: Pixabay)

Winter is an ideal time to prune deciduous fruit and shade trees, since the trees are dormant and you can more easily see the tree canopy. In many cases, pruning can also help prevent or control certain insect and disease problems. For help with...

Posted on Wednesday, January 3, 2018 at 4:41 PM
Tags: apricot (4), cherry (6), disease (32), dormant (1), environmental disorders (2), fruit (35), pest (75), prune (4), pruning (4), tree (16), trees (10), UC IPM (225), winter (11)
Focus Area Tags: Pest Management Yard & Garden

It's Time to Prune Apricot & Cherry Trees

Cluster of ripe apricots [J.K.Clark]

Although most fruit trees are pruned during the dormant season, in areas with wet winters, apricots and cherries should be pruned in late summer to allow time for the pruning wounds to close. Pruning apricots and cherries during the rainy season could...

Posted on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at 1:48 PM
Tags: apricot (4), bacterial (2), botryosphaeria (1), canker (3), cherries (4), cherry (6), diseases (9), eutypa dieback (2), fungal (1), pathogens (7), prune (4)

Avoid Pruning Apricots and Cherries in Cool Season

Figure 1. Oozing produced by fungal infection of a cherry branch pruned during a previous cool season.

Most people think about pruning fruit trees during the winter since the branch structure is most visible and winter is considered the traditional time to prune deciduous trees. Actually, pruning fruit trees mainly during the growing season is a good...

Figure 2. A cross-cut into the infected branch reveals a large fungal canker in the wood; the infection continues into the trunk.
Figure 2. A cross-cut into the infected branch reveals a large fungal canker in the wood; the infection continues into the trunk.

Figure 2. A cross-cut into the infected branch reveals a large fungal canker in the wood; the infection continues into the trunk. (C. Ingels, UCCE Sacramento)

Posted on Monday, December 1, 2014 at 8:00 AM
  • Author: Chuck Ingels, UCCE Sacramento
Tags: apricot (4), canker (3), cherry (6), pruning (4)
 
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