UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
University of California
UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: canker

Foamy Bark Canker: A New Disease on Coast Live Oak

Figure 4 Foamy liquid oozing from an infected tree. [A. Eskalen, UCR]

[From the August 2015 issue of the UC IPM Green Bulletin]  Declining coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) trees have recently been found throughout urban landscapes in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Monterey counties. A...

Posted on Friday, September 25, 2015 at 3:05 PM
Tags: Akif Eskalen (1), bark (3), beetle (10), beetles (13), canker (3), foamy (2), Geosmithia pallida (1), oak (2), oaks (1), ooze (1), Pseudopityophthorus pubipennis (1), UCCE (10)

It's Time to Prune Apricot & Cherry Trees

Cluster of ripe apricots [J.K.Clark]

Although most fruit trees are pruned during the dormant season, in areas with wet winters, apricots and cherries should be pruned in late summer to allow time for the pruning wounds to close. Pruning apricots and cherries during the rainy season could...

Posted on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at 1:48 PM
Tags: apricot (4), bacterial (2), botryosphaeria (1), canker (3), cherries (4), cherry (6), diseases (9), eutypa dieback (2), fungal (1), pathogens (7), prune (4)

Avoid Pruning Apricots and Cherries in Cool Season

Figure 1. Oozing produced by fungal infection of a cherry branch pruned during a previous cool season.

Most people think about pruning fruit trees during the winter since the branch structure is most visible and winter is considered the traditional time to prune deciduous trees. Actually, pruning fruit trees mainly during the growing season is a good...

Figure 2. A cross-cut into the infected branch reveals a large fungal canker in the wood; the infection continues into the trunk.
Figure 2. A cross-cut into the infected branch reveals a large fungal canker in the wood; the infection continues into the trunk.

Figure 2. A cross-cut into the infected branch reveals a large fungal canker in the wood; the infection continues into the trunk. (C. Ingels, UCCE Sacramento)

Posted on Monday, December 1, 2014 at 8:00 AM
  • Author: Chuck Ingels, UCCE Sacramento
Tags: apricot (4), canker (3), cherry (6), pruning (4)
 
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