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Posts Tagged: honey bee

Hey, Honey Bee, I'll Race You to the Flowers!

A honey bee and a bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, head for the same patch of lavender. This image was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, honey bee, I'll race you to the flowers. Okay, but you'll lose. I can go faster. Watch me! The scene: a male bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, and a worker honey bee, Apis mellifera, are buzzing along at breakneck speed toward the lavender in our...

Posted on Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Three's a Crowd: The Saga of Two Stink Bugs and a Bee

Find the redshouldered stink bugs in the lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So, here we are, a couple of stink bugs hidden in the lavender. Unnoticed. Undetected. Undisturbed. We're loving the lavender, and we're in the process of providing the world with more stink bugs. "Okay, we know, we know. We're red-shouldered stink...

Posted on Friday, June 9, 2017 at 4:21 PM

Not a Good Day for the Jumping Spider

A honey bee narrowly avoids the outstretched jumping spider,  a Phidippus audax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sometimes you get lucky. Sometimes you go hungry. Take the case of the huge jumping spider (a female Phidippus audax or bold jumping spider, as identified by Wade Spencer of the UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology) hanging out in our Spanish lavender....

Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 at 3:08 PM

Helicoptering in on the Spanish Lavender

A honey bee nectaring on Spanish lavender. This was taken with a Nikon D500 and a 200mm macro lens. Settings: ISO 3200, f-stop 13, and shutter speed of 1/640 of a second. No flash. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you like writing with light (photography), then you'll probably love capturing images of honey bees spinning like helicopters. In the late afternoon, when the light softens, head over to your favorite Spanish lavender patch. Pull up a chair, listen...

Posted on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 at 4:49 PM

A Delightful Find

The egg case or ootheca of a praying mantis, is attached to the stem of a lavender plant. Note the small hole on the left, near the top--the exit hole of a parasitoid, according to Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Any day's a good day when you find the ootheca (egg case) of a praying mantis in your yard. It's much better than finding an Easter egg. Ootheca comes from the Greek word "oo," meaning egg and the Latin word, "theca," meaning a cover or container. A...

Posted on Monday, February 27, 2017 at 3:40 PM

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