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Posts Tagged: honey bees

Better Statistics for the Bees

Eric Mussen
The bees. What about the bees? How are they doing?

Better, says retired Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, who today published the last edition of his newsletter, from the UC Apiaries. Last? "Or, it's the last edition I'm solely responsible for."

Mussen retired in June after 38 years of service. Now it's "Welcome, Elina Lastro," who joined the department this week. 

"The summary data from this spring's suvey on winter colony loss is available for review on beeinformed.org, the public's entry to information from the Bee Informed Parnership (BIP)," Mussen wrote. "Since it is called winter loss, it does not necessarily  record the total losses in many operations because colonies are lost over the entire year, picking up considerably in fall and winter. Until recently the summer losses, often replaced using colony splits, were unreported. The good news is that the national average loss declined to 20.7 percent, the best in about a decade. Not many beekeepers blamed CCD (no logical explanation) for their losses, but mites and starvation were leading explanations." 

Mussen pointed out that "since the data was listed by state averages, I wondered if that data were placed on a map of the U.S., could we see some sort of regional patterns." So, he did just that.

"Using colored pencils and scribbling, I colored like a kindergartner (or at least like I did in kindergarten and still  do.), I did not see much of a pattern that stuck out. The states with the highest average losses (over 60 percent) did form a cluster (Illinois, Indiana and  Michigan). The states with losses in the 50 percent range were all east of the Mississippi River: Iowa, Wisconsin, Ohio, West Virginia, New York and New Hampshire. States with losses in the 40 percent range were spread equally all over the country: Oregon, Arizona, Nebraska, Texas, Minnesota, Arkansas, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Connecticut.

"States with losses in the 30 percent range filled in a swath of states just south of the 50 and 60 percent losses, as well as Washington, Utah, South Dakota, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Maine. States with losses in the 20 percent range included seven of our southeastern states: Montana, Colorado, New Mexico, and Kansas. California, Idaho, Oklahoma and Hawaii showed state average losses below 20 percent."

Be sure to check out his latest newsletter. His website also lists many of his other newsletters and the Bee Briefs he's written over the last 38 years.

 

A honey bee foraging on a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee foraging on a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee foraging on a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sip of nectar from a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sip of nectar from a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sip of nectar from a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 5, 2014 at 6:17 PM

Those Foxy Wool Carder Bees

Foxgloves, meet the European wool carder bee.

European wool carder bee, meet the foxgloves.

It's like "old home week" when these two get together. The plant (Digitalis purpurea) and the bee (Anthidium manicatum) are both native to Europe.

European wool carder bees, so named because the females collect or "card"  leaf fuzz for their nests, were introduced in New York in 1963, and then began spreading west. They were first recorded in California (Sunnyvale) in 2007.

Honey bees (Apis mellifera) arrived in America 341 years before their cousins. European colonists brought the honey bee to America (Jamestown colony, Virginia) in 1622, but the honey bees didn't make it to California (San Jose area) until 1853.

Now they're together again, so to speak, but it's not a happy situation when a male wool carder bee spots a foraging honey bee.

Male European wool carder bees are very aggressive and territorial. They'll "bonk" other insects that land on "their" flowers such as lamb's ear, catmint and basil. They'll bodyslam honey bees, butterflies, sweat bees, carpenter bees, bumble bees and even a hungry praying mantis or an eight-legged spider (arachnid) or two. It's all about trying to save the floral resources for their own species so they can mate and reproduce.

One thing is certain: honey bees forage faster when those foxy male European wool carder bees buzz the garden.

They know each other well.

Male European wool carder bee heads for a foxglove. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Male European wool carder bee heads for a foxglove. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male European wool carder bee heads for a foxglove. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's inside? This male European carder bee is investigating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey(
What's inside? This male European carder bee is investigating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey(

What's inside? This male European carder bee is investigating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey(

Male European carder bee (right) targeting a honey bee that is seeking nectar from a hole drilled by a carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Male European carder bee (right) targeting a honey bee that is seeking nectar from a hole drilled by a carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male European carder bee (right) targeting a honey bee that is seeking nectar from a hole drilled by a carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European wool carder bee nestled inside a foxglove. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
European wool carder bee nestled inside a foxglove. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European wool carder bee nestled inside a foxglove. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 4, 2014 at 9:16 PM

How to Train Your Praying Mantis

We've trained puppies to "come," "sit" and "heel."

We've trained an African grey parrot to say "Here, kitty, kitty, kitty! Meow!"

We've trained the kitty to ignore the parrot.

But how do you train a praying mantis?

You don't.

Our resident praying mantis, the lean green machine, conceals himself in the African blue basil. That's been home, sweet home for the past week. Before that, it was the lantana, catmint, Mexican sunflower and cosmos. He goes where the bees are and the bees are now all over the African blue basil.

We cannot create a "No fly zone." We cannot ban the bees from traveling. And we cannot ban the praying mantis from doing what he does best: ambushing prey and eating them.

Lately, however, he's allowed us to photograph him in the early morning, before his bee breakfast.

He does not respond to "Say cheese!"

Nor does he respond to "Say bee!" Or "Say Apis mellifera!"

You cannot train a praying mantis.

Praying mantis stretches in the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Praying mantis stretches in the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis stretches in the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A little aerobics under the cosmos, as a bee does a flyover. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A little aerobics under the cosmos, as a bee does a flyover. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A little aerobics under the cosmos, as a bee does a flyover. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's not
It's not "Say cheese!" It's "Say bee!" (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's not "Say cheese!" It's "Say bee!" (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, September 3, 2014 at 9:16 PM

Will Hummingbird Syrup Harm the Bees?

It's no secret that honey bees like the sugar/water mixture in hummingbird feeders. If there's no bee guard on the feeder or if the feeder isn't bee-proofed, bees will sip the mixture. They also will lick the spills. A sudden gust that sways or upends the feeder is "bee happy time."

However, should we be attracting honey bees to our hummingbird feeders and/or providing them with sugar/water syrup?  Is the syrup mixture good for the bees?

Curious minds want to know.

One rural East Bay Area area resident who feeds the hummers and caters to honey bees in her garden asked that very question. Since bee guards prevent the short-tongued bees from reaching the food (hummers, as we all know, have long tongues), she hung "plant saucers from a tree with sponge in one and a terrycloth towel in the other so the liquid doesn't cause them to drown, and the bees swarm all over it to eat the sugar water. I can go through two gallons of sugar water a day.  Who knew bees could eat so much."

"Bees are in trouble elsewhere but not here," she shared. "I didn't intend to be a bee feeder.  I don't have hives for them or collect their honey."

The bees come to eat and she enjoys watching them eat. Her intention is to help the bees. "Walking into a swarm of bees to fill their feeders is thrilling.  I don't hurt them and they don't hurt me. And having them here is a simple way for me to educate people about the importance of bees and contrary to the common belief that we need to be afraid of them. People leave here with a different view of their gentleness and importance."

She makes a 3-to-1 ratio  (three parts water, one part sugar) for the hummers and bees. However, her neighbors wonder if she is harming them "because they need the protein from pollen" and the bees "might find the sugar water addictive."

Will it harm them?

Newly retired Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology has answered a lot of humminbird feeder/bee questions during his 38-year career.

"Feeding honey bee colonies sugar syrup has been going on since man determined how to refine sugar from beets and canes," Mussen said. "However, in most cases, we feed these syrups to honey bee colonies only when they are short on nectar at times when nectar is critically important, especially for brood rearing in the spring and for making sure there is enough food in the hive to get the bees through winter."

"Nectars contain very small amounts of numerous plant-derived micronutrients that are essential to honey bees," he pointed out. "We have known that all along, but recently some research has documented that components of honey make the honey better for bees than sugar syrup.  Honey-fed bees have more robust immune systems, they learn locations of food sources more rapidly, and they forage more quickly than sugar syrup-fed bees."

So, the question: Is she harming the honey bee colonies with the syrup feeders? 

"I doubt it," Mussen said. "Some beekeepers feed hundreds of colonies from open buckets of sugar syrup in southern U.S. beekeeping operations, and their colonies do just fine.  However, I counsel against such an approach, since the strongest and least needy colonies get most of the syrup, leaving little behind for the weaker, more needy colonies.  Each should be fed individually with a hive feeder."

So bottom line, "If you wish to continue feeding the bees, they will keep taking the syrup.  However, since it is not nectar, the bees will be 'robbing' the syrup from its source.  The problem with that is that once robbing gets started, bees from one colony begin to try robbing from neighboring colonies.  The bees fight at the entrances and many are killed.  I am sure that we can say that many colonies are benefitting from your syrup in one respect--just like the hummers--but there are downsides to the practice."

In addition, beekeepers may find their honeycomb tinted red or polka-dotted. It's not honey; it's syrup.

A honey bee sipping syrup from a hummingbird feeder. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee sipping syrup from a hummingbird feeder. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee sipping syrup from a hummingbird feeder. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A hummingbird pauses in between sips. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A hummingbird pauses in between sips. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A hummingbird pauses in between sips. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 2, 2014 at 5:53 PM

Keeping Bees

Eric Mussen
So you want to keep bees in your backyard...

When do you start? What should you do?

Newly retired Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, continues to field questions. He's kindly agreed to respond to beekeeping queries until the new Extension apiculturist, Elina Lastro Niño of Pennsylvania State University, comes on board in September. (Actually, we expect to see Mussen buzzing around Briggs Hall and at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility quite a bit in his retirement years.)

Some questions come from 4-H leaders who organize the youth beekeeping projects.

Mussen is quite familiar with 4-H (head, heart, health and hands), a youth development program that emphasizes "learning by doing" and "making the best better."  For decades, he's judged the annual California State 4-H Beekeeping Essay Contest.

Since 4-H'ers usually launch their projects in late summer or early fall, continuing through June, does a beekeeping project lend itself to that schedule?

No, not in the late summer or early fall.

"I won't tell you that you cannot start a colony of honey bees in the late summer or fall, but they will have a real uphill battle," Mussen recently told a 4-H leader. "The colony has to have enough time and food to rear a large enough colony population to make it through the winter.  The harder part is having access to enough nectar and pollens to rear all the brood they need and still have enough extra nectar to store as a honey crop to get them through winter.  They also need quite a bit of stored pollens to consume slowly during the winter and consume like crazy when brood-rearing starts for real around the end of December."

"Also, it will be a bit difficult to get a bunch of bees at this late date, unless you are in good with a beekeeper who will sacrifice a colony.  And, if that is the case, I would take everything and overwinter it.  Next spring you can split off some bees if you wish to raise a 'homemade' package."

Mussen says those who wish to reserve a package for next spring, should contact the bee breeder now. "They will be booked solid, due to winter colony losses this winter.  You may have to hunt around for a smaller operation that will deal with “onesies.”  The bigger producers sometimes do not like to ship less than 100 at a time.

"Otherwise, chase down a local beekeeping club and add your request (and dollars) to a larger order that the clubs put out in the spring. While packages can be obtained in late March, the mating weather can be pretty 'iffy.'  A week or two into April sounds better to me."

So, bottom line: if you want to keep bees, contact the bee breeder now.  Join a local beekeeping club and find a mentor; read beekeeping magazines, journals and books; and peruse back issues of Mussen's online newsletter, from the UC Apiaries and his Bee Briefs.   

A drone (male bee) emerging. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A drone (male bee) emerging. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone (male bee) emerging. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This frame is buzzing with bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This frame is buzzing with bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This frame is buzzing with bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 at 9:59 PM
Tags: 4-H (1), beekeeping (2), Eric Mussen (50), honey bees (210)

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