UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
University of California
UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: navel orangeworm

A World of Scents

They Deal with Scents

“Nature is more a world of scents than a source of noise.” That quote sound familiar? Chemical ecologist Jacques Le Magnen (1916-2002) said that back in 1970.World-renowned organic chemist Wittko Francke (right) of the University of Hamburg, Germany,...

They Deal with Scents
They Deal with Scents

World-renowned organic chemist Wittko Francke (second from right) met with UC Davis researchers following his presentation on Wednesday at a UC Davis Department of Entomology seminar. From left are chemical ecologist Zain Syed of the Walter Leal lab; chemical ecologist and forest entomologist Steve Seybold of the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Davis, and an affiliate of the UC Davis Department of Entomology; Wittko Francke; and chemical ecologist Walter Leal, professor and former chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, December 9, 2010 at 7:10 PM

Aw, Nuts!

Larvae Inside Walnut

Walnuts are packed with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, right? Right. And sometimes a little protein. Protein, as in larvae. That's not a welcome sight. Sometimes you'll find two or three navel orangeworm (NOW) larvae inside a single walnut,...

Larvae Inside Walnut
Larvae Inside Walnut

LARVAE INSIDE WALNUT--This fallen walnut contained three larvae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In a Nutshell
In a Nutshell

IN A NUTSHELL!--Close-up of larva inside a walnut. You can tell if it's a navel orangeworm (NOW) if it has a crescent-shaped marking on the sides of the second segment behind the head, says UC Davis entomologist Frank Zalom. Often, with NOW, there are two or more larvae inside a single nut. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, January 7, 2009 at 5:00 PM
Tags: larvae (6), navel orangeworm (3), walnuts (6)

Penchant for Pistachios Leads to Startling Find

Navel Orangeworm

Chemical ecologists at the University of California, Davis, are changing their navel-orangeworm research direction after an elementary school student’s science project found that the major agricultural pest prefers pistachios over almonds and...

Navel Orangeworm
Navel Orangeworm

PISTACHIO LOVER--This navel orangeworm showed a preference for pistachios. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Young scientist Gabriel Leal
Young scientist Gabriel Leal

YOUNG SCIENTIST--Eleven-year-old Gabriel Leal of Davis works on his science project in which he found that the navel orangeworm prefers pistachios over almonds and walnuts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, January 2, 2009 at 6:12 PM
 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu