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Posts Tagged: science

Art Shapiro: 'Butterflies as Heralds of the Apocalypse'

A newly emerged anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, spreads its wings on anise, its host plant, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterflies, beer and a bar...Who wants to drink to science? If you've ever wanted to converse with butterfly guru Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, about "butterflies and the  apocalypse" and sip a beer (or...

A newly emerged anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, spreads its wings on anise, its host plant, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly emerged anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, spreads its wings on anise, its host plant, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly emerged anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, spreads its wings on anise, its host plant, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, spreads its wings in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, spreads its wings in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, spreads its wings in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Make Earth Day Every Day - Use IPM!

Gardens can be beautiful using IPM. [E. Zagory]

Every April, we celebrate Earth Day and think about ways we can help make our planet healthier. One way to do this is to use IPM or integrated pest management to deal with pests around your home and garden! IPM is a science-based, environmentally sound...

Posted on Friday, April 21, 2017 at 10:35 PM
Tags: April (1), beneficial (10), Earth Day (3), environment (4), health. (1), integrated pest management (12), IPM (64), pesticides (28), pests (55), science (6), UC IPM (223)

Highly Successful Biodiversity Museum Day

Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a bee friendly garden, drew scores of visitors. It's located on Bee Biology Road, west of the central campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They saw bugs. They saw bones. They saw honey bees. They saw hawks. Those were just a few of the offering at the sixth annual UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day, held Saturday, Feb. 18. More than 3000 visitors checked out the offerings. The free...

Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a bee friendly garden, drew scores of visitors. It's located on Bee Biology Road, west of the central campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a bee friendly garden, drew scores of visitors. It's located on Bee Biology Road, west of the central campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a bee friendly garden, drew scores of visitors. It's located on Bee Biology Road, west of the central campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Youths used vacuum devices for catch-and-release of bees at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Youths used vacuum devices for catch-and-release of bees at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Youths used vacuum devices for catch-and-release of bees at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith (center), who curates the butterfly and moth collections at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, answers questions.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith (center), who curates the butterfly and moth collections at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, answers questions.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith (center), who curates the butterfly and moth collections at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, answers questions.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bird's eye view of the nematode collection in the Sciences Lab Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bird's eye view of the nematode collection in the Sciences Lab Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bird's eye view of the nematode collection in the Sciences Lab Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis nematology graduate student Chris Pagan talks to visitors at the nematode collection in the Sciences Lab Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis nematology graduate student Chris Pagan talks to visitors at the nematode collection in the Sciences Lab Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis nematology graduate student Chris Pagan talks to visitors at the nematode collection in the Sciences Lab Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A visitor photographs the skin of a male African lion from Tanzania (1960s). Not much else is known about it, said Andrew Engilis, Jr., curator of the Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology. This was part of a display in the Academic Surge Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A visitor photographs the skin of a male African lion from Tanzania (1960s). Not much else is known about it, said Andrew Engilis, Jr., curator of the Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology. This was part of a display in the Academic Surge Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A visitor photographs the skin of a male African lion from Tanzania (1960s). Not much else is known about it, said Andrew Engilis, Jr., curator of the Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology. This was part of a display in the Academic Surge Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Billy Thein shows a golden eagle named
Volunteer Billy Thein shows a golden eagle named "Sullivan" at the California Raptor Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Billy Thein shows a golden eagle named "Sullivan" at the California Raptor Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Diana Munoz shows a red-shouldered hawk, Mikey, at the California Raptor Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Volunteer Diana Munoz shows a red-shouldered hawk, Mikey, at the California Raptor Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Diana Munoz shows a red-shouldered hawk, Mikey, at the California Raptor Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Real Skinny on Migrating Monarchs, Milkweed

A male monarch nectaring Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A recent article in Science magazine, headlined “Plan to Save Monarch Butterflies Backfires,” is getting a lot of attention. And UC Davis butterfly expert Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, is getting a lot of...

A male monarch nectaring Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch nectaring Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch nectaring Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, January 16, 2015 at 5:55 PM

Shattering 'Standard Knowledge'

This is the research site at the Sagehen Creek Field Station managed by ecologists Louie Yang of UC Davis and Dan Gruner of the University of Maryland. (Photo Courtesy of Louie Yang)

The times, they change. Standard textbook knowledge, that can change, too. It did today. For several decades,  few people challenged "the hump-shaped model" developed in the early 1970s by British ecologist Philip Grime who proposed that the number of...

This is the research site at the Sagehen Creek Field Station managed by ecologists Louie Yang of UC Davis and Dan Gruner of the University of Maryland. (Photo Courtesy of Louie Yang)
This is the research site at the Sagehen Creek Field Station managed by ecologists Louie Yang of UC Davis and Dan Gruner of the University of Maryland. (Photo Courtesy of Louie Yang)

This is the research site at the Sagehen Creek Field Station managed by ecologists Louie Yang of UC Davis and Dan Gruner of the University of Maryland. (Photo Courtesy of Louie Yang)

Posted on Thursday, September 22, 2011 at 8:24 PM
Tags: ecology (2), Louie Yang (13), Science (6)

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