UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: tropical milkweed

Winter Monarchs: Thankfully, They're Out There

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thankfully, they're out there. Butterfly guru Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, spotted a female monarch butterfly at 1:35 today. As he mentioned in his email: "So, at 1:25 p.m. a female monarch flew directly...

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.
This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.

This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.

Posted on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 at 4:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Honey Bees Do Love That Milkweed

A honey bee nectars on tropical milkweed, while another bee gets ready to join her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Don't tell the honey bees. They will forage where they want to--whether it's on bee balm, a dandelion or that controversial tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. Just before we cut back the tropical milkweed for the season, the honey bees...

A honey bee nectars on tropical milkweed, while another bee gets ready to join her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee nectars on tropical milkweed, while another bee gets ready to join her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectars on tropical milkweed, while another bee gets ready to join her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These two honey bees can't get enough of this tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
These two honey bees can't get enough of this tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These two honey bees can't get enough of this tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees and tropical milkweed blossoms make for a pretty image. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bees and tropical milkweed blossoms make for a pretty image. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees and tropical milkweed blossoms make for a pretty image. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 16, 2020 at 5:32 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Hi, I'm a Jumping Spider

A jumping spider, member of the Salticidae family, perches on a tropical milkweed plant and eyes the photographer. Friend or foe? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hi, I'm a jumping spider. I see that you found me on the tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica.  I'm just here for the prey, and you are definitely not prey, so not to worry. I'm a member of the Salticidae family and my family...

A jumping spider, member of the Salticidae family, perches on a tropical milkweed plant and eyes the photographer. Friend or foe? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A jumping spider, member of the Salticidae family, perches on a tropical milkweed plant and eyes the photographer. Friend or foe? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A jumping spider, member of the Salticidae family, perches on a tropical milkweed plant and eyes the photographer. Friend or foe? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 5:16 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

Welcome to the World of Monarchs, Greta!

This monarch caterpillar was reared from an egg collected on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Welcome to the world of monarchs, Greta! We don't normally name the monarch butterflies we rear, but we decided that the first one reared from an egg "The Greg Way" would be named for Greg--naturalist Greg Kareofelas, associate at the Bohart Museum...

This monarch caterpillar was reared from an egg collected on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This monarch caterpillar was reared from an egg collected on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This monarch caterpillar was reared from an egg collected on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The newly eclosed monarch caterpillar named
The newly eclosed monarch caterpillar named "Greta" latches onto a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The newly eclosed monarch caterpillar named "Greta" latches onto a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Greta, a monarch butterfly reared from an egg, is anxious to get where she's going. And fast. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Greta, a monarch butterfly reared from an egg, is anxious to get where she's going. And fast. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Greta, a monarch butterfly reared from an egg, is anxious to get where she's going. And fast. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterflies start out as a near microscopic egg. This image was taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch butterflies start out as a near microscopic egg. This image was taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterflies start out as a near microscopic egg. This image was taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

After hatching from egg to larva (caterpillar), it eats its shell and then begins munching on milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
After hatching from egg to larva (caterpillar), it eats its shell and then begins munching on milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

After hatching from egg to larva (caterpillar), it eats its shell and then begins munching on milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch caterpillar munches milkweed; it will go through  five instars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch caterpillar munches milkweed; it will go through five instars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch caterpillar munches milkweed; it will go through five instars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jade-green monarch chrysalis is one of nature's jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The jade-green monarch chrysalis is one of nature's jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jade-green monarch chrysalis is one of nature's jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 1, 2020 at 3:04 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

A Bee-Line Toward the Tropical Milkweed

A honey bee forages on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden on July 27. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees just can't get enough of our tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. We plant three species of milkweed (the host plant for the monarchs), but both the monarchs and the honey bees gravitate toward A. curassavica,...

A honey bee forages on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden on July 27. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee forages on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden on July 27. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee forages on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden on July 27. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee makes a beeline for the tropical milkweed,Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee makes a beeline for the tropical milkweed,Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee makes a beeline for the tropical milkweed,Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee nectaring on the tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee nectaring on the tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee nectaring on the tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away toward the next tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Up, up and away toward the next tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away toward the next tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee takes flight, returning to her colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee takes flight, returning to her colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee takes flight, returning to her colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 27, 2020 at 3:47 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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