UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Bohart Museum of Entomology

Seeing Spots All Day

A female whitetail, Plathemis lydia, claims a bamboo stake. This dragonfly is often mistaken for a twelve-spotted dragonfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"You can hawk and perch in our yard all day if you want," I told her. And she did.  A spotted dragonfly chose a spot in our pollinator garden--a bamboo stake overlooking a patch of Verbena and African blue basil--and she stayed most of the...

Posted on Tuesday, July 19, 2016 at 6:43 PM

Celebrate Moths at the Bohart Museum on Saturday Night, July 30

UC Davis entomology graduate student Jessica Gillung shows Atlas moths from the Bohart Museum collection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready...set...go! It's almost time to celebrate moths! How much do you know about moths? Do you know the difference between a moth and a butterfly? Have you ever seen some of the world's largest moths, such as the Atlas moth? Have you ever collected...

Posted on Friday, July 15, 2016 at 5:20 PM

Quick, What's the California State Insect?

California dogface butterfly poster at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis.

Quick, what's the California state insect? Umm, does California have a state insect? The Monarch? The Western Tiger Swallowtail? The Red Admiral? Wait, isn't this National Pollinator Week? Should I know what the state insect is? Yes, it is National...

Posted on Tuesday, June 21, 2016 at 4:29 PM

Why That Ol' Flame Stakes Out the Back Yard

Red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sometimes the red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) will let you approach it. Sometimes it's having a bad hair day or a bad predator/prey day or a just-leave-me-alone day and won't let you near it. This one (below) let me approach it. "Hey,"...

Posted on Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 5:38 PM

Crane Flies Are Here, There and Everywhere

A crane fly dangles from a spider web. It is about to become prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You don't have to crane your neck to see the crane flies. They're everywhere. They're zigzagging around your yard, bumping into walls and windows,  landing on your screen door and fence, and clustering on your porch lights, all the while searching...

Posted on Friday, May 6, 2016 at 5:30 PM

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