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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

UC Garden Blogs

Penchant for Pistachios Leads to Startling Find

Navel Orangeworm

Chemical ecologists at the University of California, Davis, are changing their navel-orangeworm research direction after an elementary school student’s science project found that the major agricultural pest prefers pistachios over almonds and...

Navel Orangeworm
Navel Orangeworm

PISTACHIO LOVER--This navel orangeworm showed a preference for pistachios. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Young scientist Gabriel Leal
Young scientist Gabriel Leal

YOUNG SCIENTIST--Eleven-year-old Gabriel Leal of Davis works on his science project in which he found that the navel orangeworm prefers pistachios over almonds and walnuts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, January 2, 2009 at 6:12 PM

Twenty-Nine Days to Go

Rock Purslane

Twenty-nine days to go. If you love bees and know how to design a bee friendly garden, remember Jan. 30. Jan. 30 is the deadline to submit your design for the half-acre bee friendly garden at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC...

Rock Purslane
Rock Purslane

ROCK PURSLANE--The magenta-colored rock purslane (Calandrinia grandiflora) is a favorite of honey bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of Bee
Close-up of Bee

CLOSE-UP OF BEE--A honey bee gathers nectar on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, January 1, 2009 at 5:56 PM

Turning Over a New Leaf

Praying Mantis

For my New Year's resolution, I resolve to turn over a new leaf. Oh, sure, most folks resolve to eat less, exercise more, drink less, read more, stress less, save more, gripe less, and volunteer more. Not me. I'm turning over a new leaf. You...

Praying Mantis
Praying Mantis

TURN OVER A NEW LEAF--and there's a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Crane Fly
Crane Fly

TURN OVER A NEW LEAF--and there's a crane fly, also known as a mosquito hawk. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ladybug
Ladybug

TURN OVER A NEW LEAF--and there's a ladybug, aka lady beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2008 at 4:23 PM

Flying Flower

Blue Butterfly

Ponce Denis Écouchard Lebrun compared the butterfly to a flying flower: The butterfly is a flying flower, The flower a tethered butterfly. At the recent Entomological Society of America meeting in Reno, a blue butterfly drew the attention of...

Blue Butterfly
Blue Butterfly

BLUE BUTTERFLY--This butterfly in the live butterfly display at the Entomological Society of America's recent meeting in Reno prompted photographers to aim, focus and shoot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterfly Pin
Butterfly Pin

BUTTERFLY JEWELRY--Does life imitate art or art imitate life? This butterfly pin at the Entomological Society of America's recent meeting in Reno looked somewhat like the live butterflies inside a nearby display. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2008 at 6:28 PM

What a Buzz!

Honey Bee

Right out of Champaign, Ill., comes a research story about honey bees on coke. Cocaine. University of Illinois entomology and neuroscience professor Gene Robinson and his colleagues have found that honey bees on cocaine dance more. "In a study...

Honey Bee
Honey Bee

GATHERING NECTAR--This honey bee at the University of California, Davis, is gathering nectar on Cenizo (Leucophyllum frutescens). Newly published research from the University of Illinois finds that honey bees on cocaine dance more, and that the bees are motivated by feelings of reward. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, December 29, 2008 at 6:12 PM

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