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What's for Dinner?

Camouflaged

The praying mantis isn't at all concerned about culinary choices. It doesn't worry about who's coming to dinner, only that dinner will come. This aggressive, predatory insect will eat just about anything it can get its claws on, entomologists agree....

Camouflaged
Camouflaged

The praying mantis, camouflaged, lies in wait. Hmmm, is that camera edible?(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Waiting for dinner
Waiting for dinner

A praying mantis awaits prey. Note its forelegs with strong spikes for grabbing and grasping prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 6, 2008 at 2:48 PM

The Secret's Out

Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility

The secret's out. Or, rather, the secret's in.  Inside. A number of years ago, UC Davis entomologist Diane Ullman created a ceramic sign outside the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, located on Bee Biology Road, west of the UC...

Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility
Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility

See the ceramic hive on this sign at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility? The black hole leads to a real hive, located in back of the sign. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Heading in
Heading in

Honey bees head through the opening of the hive in the sign at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 3, 2008 at 6:25 PM

The Bee and the Fly

A bee meets a fly

UC Davis forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey is a genius, to be sure. Show him a fly and he'll tell you exactly what it is and what it's all about. I shot this photo at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. The honey bee...

A bee meets a fly
A bee meets a fly

A honey bee checks out a minute black scavenger fly at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 2, 2008 at 12:39 PM

What Price Pollination?

Silver wings

What are insect pollinators worth to the global economy? Well, it's a lot less than the Wall Street bailout...er...rescue plan. Recent research published in the journal Ecological Economics  reveals just how important insect...

Silver wings
Silver wings

The honey bee, resplendent here with silvery wings, is gold to the global economy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bee on almond blossom
Bee on almond blossom

A honey bee visits an almond blossom. California's 700,000 acres of almonds require two hives per acre for pollination. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 1, 2008 at 11:43 AM
Tags: almonds (24), economy (2), honey bee (200), pollination (13), price of pollination (1)

Seeing Spots

Ladybug

If you spot a ladybug, don't just start reciting "Ladybug, ladybug, fly away home." Aim, click and shoot. With a camera, that is. Agricultural Research Service scientists and entomologists at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., and South...

Ladybug
Ladybug

A ladybug crawls along the leaf of a Russian sage. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pupa
Pupa

A ladybug pupa on Russian sage. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2008 at 2:19 PM

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