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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

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Behold the Dragonfly

William Yuen wearing dragonfly t-shirt

Some folks wear their heart on their sleeve.   Others wear a dragonfly on their chest. As part of its public outreach education program and to showcase the world of insects, the...

William Yuen wearing dragonfly t-shirt
William Yuen wearing dragonfly t-shirt

UC Davis undergraduate student William Yuen wearing his dragonfly t-shirt. He has worked part-time in the Bohart Museum of Entomology for two years. (Photo by Fran Keller)

White-belted ringtail dragonfly
White-belted ringtail dragonfly

This is the white-belted ringtail dragonfly from the Bohart Museum of Entomology poster. The poster and dragonfly t-shirts are available at the Bohart Museum, 1124 Academic Surge, UC Davis, or at http://bohart.ucdavis.edu.

Sympetrum  by Fran Keller
Sympetrum by Fran Keller

This spectacular dragonfly photo, taken by UC Davis entomology doctoral candidate Fran Keller, is a Sympetrum sp. that she took in her back yard on July 28, 2007, in North Davis. This is one of her favorite photos. "This picture," she says, "shows how incredibly delicate they are and their legs so slim and yet grasping on the edge of this twig they maintain balance. The eye color reminds me of a watercolor painting and the red on the abdomen is such a contrast to the yellow spots on the thorax."

Posted on Wednesday, September 17, 2008 at 3:06 PM

To Bee or Not to Bee

Aviator

To bee or not to bee. Not to bee. The flying insect hovering over the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden,  UC Davis Arboretum, looked like a honey bee or wasp at first glance. It wasn't. It was a hover fly or syphrid fly from the...

Aviator
Aviator

Like a hovering helicopter, the hover fly lingers over flowers in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gathering nectar
Gathering nectar

The hover fly, from the syrphid family, works the flowers in the Storer Garden, part of the UC Davis Arboretum. The syphrids, in their larval stage, eat plant-sucking pests or decaying matter, and in their adult stage, they pollinate flowers as they go after the nectar and pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 16, 2008 at 1:38 PM
Tags: aviator (1), drone flies (4), flower flies (6), hover flies (6), syphrids (1), Syrphidae (8)

High-Wire Act

Heading in

It’s like going to the circus. A bee circus. When you see honey bees gather pollen from a gaura (Gaura linheimeri), it’s as if  they ran off and joined the circus. You'll see hire-wire (er...high-stem) acts, somersaults, pirouettes, cartwheels...

Heading in
Heading in

A pollen-packin' honey bee heads toward a gaura (Gaura linheimeri). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ah, a gaura!
Ah, a gaura!

The honey bee gives her stamp of approval to the gaura, a perennial also known as "the bee blossom." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Under the Big Top
Under the Big Top

The honey bee seems to relish being under The Big Top. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Balancing act
Balancing act

The honey bee performs a balancing act on the gaura. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Upside down
Upside down

The honey bee gathers pollen from a gaura. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

High-wire act
High-wire act

The honey bee dangles from a gaura. And, no net below! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 15, 2008 at 2:12 PM
Tags: bee blossom (1), butterfly bush (12), circus act (1), Gaura linheimeri (1), guara (1), honey bees (353), pollen (27)

Cute as a Button (Willow)

Heading for the Nectar

A bee on a ball. When it flowers, the button-willow (Cephalanthus occidentalis), also known as willow buttonbush, honey ball, and button ball (oh, that’s so close to butter ball!) attracts honey bees and butterflies like you...

Heading for the Nectar
Heading for the Nectar

A honey bee heads for the colorful button-willows (Cephalanthus occidentalis).(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bee on a ball
A bee on a ball

A honey bee on a willow-button (Cephalanthus occidentalis) in Yolo County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 12, 2008 at 2:19 PM

The Queen Bee

The queen bee and her court

If you were a queen bee, you'd be laying about 1500 to 2000 eggs today. It's your busy season. "She's an egg-laying machine," said bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis....

The queen bee and her court
The queen bee and her court

The queen bee (the largest bee, center) is surrounded by her court, the worker bees, who take care of her every need. They feed her, groom her and protect her "and then they have the additional tasks of rearing and feeding her young," said bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology. (Photo courtesy of Susan Cobey, UC Davis Department of Entomology)

A Marked Queen Bee
A Marked Queen Bee

Where's the queen bee? She's easy to spot. She's the one with the dot. These bees are part of a colony being reared by Kim Fondrk of UC Davis. See http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/news/beestock.html. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2008 at 11:29 AM
Tags: drones (8), Kim Fondrk (10), queen bee (10), Susan Cobey (84), worker bees (5)

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