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Posts Tagged: USAID

More irrigation for climate-smart farming and food security in Guatemala

Connecting 9,000 rural households in Guatemala with improved water management and climate-smart agriculture strategies is the goal of a new project led by a team at UC Davis, to ultimately increase food security and reduce poverty in Guatemala's Western Highlands.

Meagan Terry, left, a UC Davis researcher with the Horticulture Innovation Lab in Guatemala, discusses conservation agriculture with a Guatemalan consultant and a local youth group member. (Photo by Beth Mitcham)
Called MásRiego (“more irrigation”), the project aims to increase farmers' incomes and their use of climate-smart strategies, including drip irrigation, rainwater harvesting, reduced tillage, mulch use and diverse crop rotation. To enable farmers to adopt these new practices, the team will not only provide trainings but also build partnerships to increase farmers' access to needed micro-credit financing and irrigation equipment.

“The opportunity to impact so many farmers' lives on this scale is exciting,” said Beth Mitcham, director of the Horticulture Innovation Lab and a UC Cooperative Extension specialist in the UC Davis Department of Plant Sciences. “We're taking lessons learned from our previous research — in Guatemala, Honduras and Cambodia — and building a team to help more small-scale farmers apply our findings and successfully use these innovative practices.”

The new project is part of the U.S. government's global hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future. The project represents an additional $3.4 million investment in the UC Davis-led Horticulture Innovation Lab by the U.S. Agency for International Development's mission in Guatemala.

The project's international team also includes representatives from Kansas State University; North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; the Centro de Paz Bárbara Ford in Guatemala; Universidad Rafael Landívar in Guatemala; and the Panamerican Agricultural School, Zamorano, in Honduras.

“The learning shared between these three U.S. universities and the universities in Honduras and Guatemala will be enriching for all of the institutions involved,” said Manuel Reyes, research professor at Kansas State University who is part of the team. “I find it satisfying that these academic institutions will be investing intellectually in marginalized groups in Guatemala's Western Highlands — and in turn, learning from them too.”

Helping youth envision a future in agriculture

Miguel Isaias Sanchez has started farming with drip irrigation and a water tower, using information from one of the first MásRiego trainings. (Photo by Beth Mitcham)
The new MásRiego project will focus on helping farmers, particularly women and youth, grow high-value crops on very small plots of land (200 square meters minimum), in the Quiché, Quetzaltenango and Totonicapán departments of Guatemala's Western Highlands.

By partnering with local youth groups and agricultural schools, the team will better prepare students for jobs in commercial agriculture and agricultural extension with knowledge of climate-resilient conservation and water management practices.

“Our local team is training youth as entrepreneurs, to see agriculture as an economic opportunity instead of just back-breaking work,” said Meagan Terry, UC Davis junior specialist who is managing the project in Guatemala for the Horticulture Innovation Lab. “They can envision a future in agriculture, with innovative ways to create value-added products or grow high-value crops for niche markets.”

As rainfall patterns vary with climate change, farmers in this region are expected to face increased competition for water. Practices such as rainwater harvesting, drip irrigation and conservation agriculture will become more necessary for small-scale farmers.

Climate-smart lessons from conservation agriculture, drip irrigation

In previous research, the Horticulture Innovation Lab has found that combining drip irrigation with conservation agriculture practices can successfully grow vegetables on small plots of land, without significant yield reductions. These practices improve soil structure, moisture retention and soil health.

Additionally, women farmers who participated in the Horticulture Innovation Lab studies in Cambodia, Honduras and Guatemala favored using these practices for another important reason: reduced labor in relation to controlling weeds, vegetable bed preparation and manual watering.

“I dream for many women, youth and their families, that their lives will be better off because of 'MasRiego' and the science behind this work,” Reyes said. “As for the research, we are learning how to improve this suite of practices so they can be tailor fitted globally. I am convinced that if this picks up, steep sloping lands can be farmed with the soil quality not being degraded — but even being enriched.”

These lessons, as well as findings from the program's “Advancing Horticulture” report about horticultural sector growth in Central America, lay the foundation for this new project.

A previous version of this article was published by UC Davis News Service and on the Horticulture Innovation Lab blog


Curious about partnering with the Horticulture Innovation Lab? The Horticulture Innovation Lab builds partnerships between agricultural researchers in the United States and researchers in developing countries, to conduct fruit and vegetable research that improves livelihoods in developing countries. The program currently has three research grant opportunities for U.S. researchers: one focused on tomatoes, another on apricots, and a third on integrated crop-livestock systems. 

Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 8:02 AM

Mark your calendar for World Food Day events

The day for collectively taking action against global hunger is still two months away. But September and October are already shaping up as “world food months,” with a number of events connecting Californians to their food systems and the world's food challenges.

World Food Day officially falls on October 16, honoring the establishment of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). In the meantime, here are a few worldly UC events to look out for, both online and in person:

UC Student Video Challenge calls for student stories

The World Food Center at UC Davis is kick-starting the World Food Day spirit of building awareness around solutions for ending hunger. In partnership with the UC ANR Nutrition Policy Institute and the UC Global Food Initiative, the Center launched a video contest for students across the 10 UC campuses—including extension offices and health systems—to capture stories on UC research related to food or nutrition security, as defined in the second of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. Students can win up to $1,000 and a paid trip to the World Food Prize International Symposium. The deadline is September 7. 

 

World Bank and International Year of Pulses 

Combining World Food Day with the FAO's celebration of pulses for being a sustainable protein source, the agriculture and SecureNutrition groups at the World Bank are teaming up with the World Food Center to host a talk on the role of legumes in nutrition, climate-smart agriculture and serving low-income countries. Douglas Cook, director of the Chickpea Innovation Lab at UC Davis, will deliver the presentation, which will be streamed online as well, on October 6.

Talk from recent head of UN World Food Programme 

Speaking on the need for ensuring the world's neediest receive not only enough food, but the right food, World Prize laureate Catherine Bertini will deliver a public lecture in honor of World Food Day. The World Food Center is hosting Bertini at UC Davis on October 10, also with livestreaming available. The winning submissions for the World Food Day Video Challenge will be showcased ahead of the lecture.

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(Photo: Karin Higgins/UC Davis)

UC research at World Food Prize 

Known as the “Borlaug Dialogue,” the World Food Prize International Symposium is the most prestigious gathering in food and agriculture. Beth Mitcham, head of the Horticulture Innovation Lab at UC Davis will speak at the symposium, while the World Food Center is again organizing a panel discussion, this time focused on measures of progress for nutrition security and featuring leaders from the FAO, the US Agency for International Development and the International Food Policy Research Institute.

In past years, World Food Prize laureates have included researchers from UC San Francisco, UC Berkeley and UC Davis. The symposium is held in Des Moines, Iowa, on October 12-14, and will be livestreamed as well.  

From “Tank” to “Fork” and everything in between 

While not directly connected to World Food Day, Sacramento's annual Farm-to-Fork celebrations have locals tipping their glasses to the close connection Californians share with the nation's top ag economy. Tastings, farm tours, food drives and street festivals span the month of September. The Farm Tank conference, meanwhile, is partnering with UC Davis and the Farm-to-Fork organizers to expand the foodie dialogue with a list of speakers ranging from corporate chefs to food reporters and UC ANR's chief information officer, Gabe Youtsey. The event also takes place in Sacramento, on September 22.

Posted on Monday, August 15, 2016 at 2:14 PM
  • Author: Brad Hooker
 
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