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UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

UC Garden Blogs

Winter Monarchs: Thankfully, They're Out There

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thankfully, they're out there. Butterfly guru Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, spotted a female monarch butterfly at 1:35 today. As he mentioned in his email: "So, at 1:25 p.m. a female monarch flew directly...

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar and a honey bee sharing tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in the summer of 2020 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.
This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.

This is the graph that WSU entomologist David James posted on his Facebook research page, Monarchs Butterflies in the Pacific Northwest.

Posted on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 at 4:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

UC partners with Gotham Greens to advance indoor agriculture

Gotham Greens is building a state-of-the-art greenhouse near UC Davis and partnering with UC ANR and UC Davis to advance research and innovation in indoor agriculture, greenhouse technology and urban agriculture. Photo courtesy of Gotham Greens

Gotham Greens, a pioneer in indoor agriculture operating high-tech greenhouses across the United States, is placing its latest state-of-the-art greenhouse near UC Davis.

“We are building a Controlled Environment Agriculture Consortium to support and advance the indoor farming industry, grow more fresh produce on less land and create new jobs for Californians,” said Gabriel Youtsey, UC ANR chief innovation officer. “Gotham Greens is an anchoring partner of this research and industry collaboration that we hope will spur innovation, create a new indoor farming workforce and support industry growth.”

University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources and the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have entered into a partnership with Gotham Greens to advance research and innovation in the areas of indoor agriculture, advanced greenhouse technology and urban agriculture. The new greenhouse facility enables opportunities for Gotham Greens and the University of California system to collaborate on research and innovation focused on advancing the science, workforce, technology and profitability of indoor agriculture globally.

“We are proud to bring Gotham Greens to the West Coast and partner with one of the highest ranked agricultural research centers in the world to advance the entire agriculture system,” said Viraj Puri, Gotham Greens co-founder and CEO. “California is responsible for growing one-third of the country's vegetables and two-thirds of the nation's fruits, yet in recent years, issues surrounding drought, food safety and worker welfare have demonstrated the need for continued innovation. Gotham Greens offers consumers clean, safe and sustainably grown leafy greens, herbs and versatile, time-saving plant-based dressings, dips and cooking sauces.”

Located in Solano County, the first phase of Gotham Greens' 10-acre greenhouse facility is expected to open in 2021 and will enable the company to deliver fresh, greenhouse-grown leafy greens to more retailers, foodservice operators and consumers on the West Coast. The company operates one of the largest and most advanced networks of hydroponic greenhouses in North America, where the demand for indoor-grown produce continues to surge. Nearly a decade after launching the nation's first commercial-scale rooftop greenhouse, Gotham Greens continues to reimagine how and where fresh produce is grown across America. 

“We're excited about collaborating with Gotham Greens, which is a coveted employer for tomorrow's leaders in agriculture and engineering,” said Helene Dillard, UCD CAES dean. “This partnership will offer our students the chance to learn best practices from leading experts in indoor farming.”

The greenhouse will generate 60 full-time jobs and provide students in the University of California system with an opportunity to learn firsthand from the industry leader. Gotham Greens recently raised $87 million in new equity and debt capital, bringing the fast-growing company's total financing to $130 million and fueling its next phase of growth.

"We are delighted for Gotham Greens to join Solano County's thriving agricultural economy and help to usher in a new era in farming innovation, job creation and economic growth for the region,” said Solano County Supervisor John Vasquez.

Gotham Greens owns and operates greenhouses in New York, Illinois, Rhode Island, Maryland and Colorado. Its products are currently available in more than 40 U.S. states and 2,000 retail stores. 

Posted on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 at 10:39 AM
Focus Area Tags: Innovation

Perseverance Prevailed

A winter monarch caterpillar munching on the remnants of milkweed on Jan. 23 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Perseverance prevailed. The third instar monarch caterpillar we found munching on the remnants of our cut-back milkweed on Jan. 23 in Vacaville, Calif., is now an adult butterfly fluttering around the neighborhood. We brought the caterpillar in...

A winter monarch caterpillar munching on the remnants of milkweed on Jan. 23 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A winter monarch caterpillar munching on the remnants of milkweed on Jan. 23 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A winter monarch caterpillar munching on the remnants of milkweed on Jan. 23 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The caterpillar is about to
The caterpillar is about to "J" and pupate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The caterpillar is about to "J" and pupate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's almost a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's almost a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's almost a chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The formation of the chrysalis is complete. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The formation of the chrysalis is complete. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The formation of the chrysalis is complete. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The iconic monarch wings are visible through the translucent chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The iconic monarch wings are visible through the translucent chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The iconic monarch wings are visible through the translucent chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

New life! A monarch butterfly, a male, drying its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
New life! A monarch butterfly, a male, drying its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

New life! A monarch butterfly, a male, drying its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male monarch spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male monarch spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male monarch spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to lift off! Shortly after this image was taken, the male monarch fluttered away. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready to lift off! Shortly after this image was taken, the male monarch fluttered away. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to lift off! Shortly after this image was taken, the male monarch fluttered away. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 1, 2021 at 4:26 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Herbicide Trial in Delta Drill-Seeded Rice - 2020

Figure 1. Predominant weeds in the trial were watergrass and barnyardgrass.

From the San Joaquin Valley Delta Field Crops blog • Jan. 21, 2021 Michelle Leinfelder-Miles is the UC Cooperative Extension Delta Crops Resource Management Advisor serving San Joaquin, Sacramento, Yolo, Solano, and Contra Costa...

Posted on Sunday, February 28, 2021 at 6:00 AM
Tags: Delta (2), herbicide (78), Rice (43)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Pest Management

UC Davis-Based Projects: To Bee or Not to Bee?

A honey bee foraging on manzanita in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

To bee or not to bee? That's a crucial question as the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day/Month, Honey Bee Haven and the California Master Beekeeper Program scramble for funds between now and Sunday, Feb. 28. That's when the UC...

A honey bee foraging on manzanita in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee foraging on manzanita in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee foraging on manzanita in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Month showcases 12 museums or collections this year, including the Bohart Museum of Entomology. This image shows butterflies from Belize, part of the Bohart collection. They are (far right) Blue Morpho, Morpho helenor montezuma; (top left), a leaf mimic, Fountainea eurypyle confusa; and a blue hairstreak, Pseudolycaena damo, according to entomologist Jeff Smiths who curates the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Month showcases 12 museums or collections this year, including the Bohart Museum of Entomology. This image shows butterflies from Belize, part of the Bohart collection. They are (far right) Blue Morpho, Morpho helenor montezuma; (top left), a leaf mimic, Fountainea eurypyle confusa; and a blue hairstreak, Pseudolycaena damo, according to entomologist Jeff Smiths who curates the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Month showcases 12 museums or collections this year, including the Bohart Museum of Entomology. This image shows butterflies from Belize, part of the Bohart collection. They are (far right) Blue Morpho, Morpho helenor montezuma; (top left), a leaf mimic, Fountainea eurypyle confusa; and a blue hairstreak, Pseudolycaena damo, according to entomologist Jeff Smiths who curates the Lepidoptera section. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, opens a hive at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, opens a hive at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, opens a hive at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, February 26, 2021 at 3:43 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

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