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Posts Tagged: Benicia

A Beauty of a Day: Bumble Bees in Benicia

A yellow-faced bumble bee,  Bombus vosnesenskii,heads for an almond blossom in Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If there's anything better than seeing honey bees foraging on almond blossoms, it's this: Bumble bees foraging on almond blossoms. Make that the yellow-faced bumble bees,  Bombus vosnesenskii, in Benicia. Sunday morning as the temperatures soared...

A yellow-faced bumble bee,  Bombus vosnesenskii,heads for an almond blossom in Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii,heads for an almond blossom in Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii,heads for an almond blossom in Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee,  Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on almonds in Benica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on almonds in Benica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on almonds in Benica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow thorax and face help identify  Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow thorax and face help identify Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow thorax and face help identify Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A wing of Bombus vosnesenskii glistens in the sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A wing of Bombus vosnesenskii glistens in the sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A wing of Bombus vosnesenskii glistens in the sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow abdominal stripe helps characterize  Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow abdominal stripe helps characterize Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow abdominal stripe helps characterize Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to go! Bombus vosnesenskii departs one blossom for another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to go! Bombus vosnesenskii departs one blossom for another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to go! Bombus vosnesenskii departs one blossom for another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Sunday, January 27, 2019 at 4:49 PM

Foraging Bumble Bees: Check Out the Orange Pollen

A yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on rosemary at the Benicia Marina on New Year's Day, 2018. Note the orange pollen, derived from another floral species, probably California golden poppies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bring on the bumble bees! In yesterday's Bug Squad blog, we mentioned the unusual first-of-the-year bumble bee sightings at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. We captured images of the yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on...

A yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on rosemary at the Benicia Marina on New Year's Day, 2018. Note the orange pollen, derived from another floral species, probably California golden poppies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on rosemary at the Benicia Marina on New Year's Day, 2018. Note the orange pollen, derived from another floral species, probably California golden poppies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on rosemary at the Benicia Marina on New Year's Day, 2018. Note the orange pollen, derived from another floral species, probably California golden poppies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for another rosemary blossom at the Benicia Marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for another rosemary blossom at the Benicia Marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for another rosemary blossom at the Benicia Marina. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-bee! The foraging bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, displays a little of its orange pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Peek-a-bee! The foraging bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, displays a little of its orange pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-bee! The foraging bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, displays a little of its orange pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, January 2, 2018 at 4:59 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

Celebrating the New Year with Bumble Bees in Benicia

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, forages on New Year's Day, 2017, on jade at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

While folks from Alaska to Colorado to New York to Maine are shivering in freezing temperatures, here in sunny California--well, at least parts of the Golden State are sunny--bumble bees are foraging on winter blooms. Bumble bees? On the first day of...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, forages on New Year's Day, 2017, on jade at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, forages on New Year's Day, 2017, on jade at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, forages on New Year's Day, 2017, on jade at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Check out the cream-colored pollen on this yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring today (Jan. 1) on jade at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Check out the cream-colored pollen on this yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring today (Jan. 1) on jade at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Check out the cream-colored pollen on this yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring today (Jan. 1) on jade at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bottoms up! A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, dips  for nectar on a jade blossom in Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bottoms up! A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, dips for nectar on a jade blossom in Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bottoms up! A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, dips for nectar on a jade blossom in Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 1, 2018 at 3:04 PM

Going Native

Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees aren't the only bees out foraging. We saw our first native bee of the season on Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at the UC Davis...

Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, foraging Jan. 25 at the Benicia Capitol State Park. Note the tiny wasp, which appears to be a bethylid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The head of the sweat bee,Halictus rubicundus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The head of the sweat bee,Halictus rubicundus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The head of the sweat bee,Halictus rubicundus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, prepars for take-off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, prepars for take-off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus, prepars for take-off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 6:15 PM

Quick! Find the Damselfly!

This female damselfly, Argia vivida, can barely be distinguished from the twig she's resting on. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Quick! Find the damselfly! This damselfly (below)  is so camouflaged that it's difficult to see her. Her? She's a female Argia vivida, as identified by Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology at UC...

This female damselfly, Argia vivida, can barely be distinguished from the twig she's resting on. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This female damselfly, Argia vivida, can barely be distinguished from the twig she's resting on. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This female damselfly, Argia vivida, can barely be distinguished from the twig she's resting on. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, April 1, 2015 at 5:53 PM
Tags: Argia vivida (1), Benicia (12), camouflage (3), damselfy (1), Greg Fareofelas (1), Lynn Kimsey (255)

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