UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County
University of California
UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: school

Outdoor Baiting for Cockroaches

Figure 3. Turkestan cockroaches attracted to spilled food. (Credit: A Sutherland)

Two species of Blatta cockroaches can be common peridomestic pests in California, including the familiar oriental cockroach (B. orientalis) and a relative newcomer, the Turkestan cockroach (B. lateralis, Figure 1).  Adults of both species are large...

Posted on Wednesday, July 10, 2019 at 8:58 AM
Tags: bait (4), cockroaches (12), pest (75), pest management (25), pest management professionals (4), public health (4), school (11), Sutherland (9), trapping (3), traps (6), UC IPM (225)

Go back-to-school with a garden

It's that time already when the kids start heading back to school and meals go back to a strict schedule. It can be easy to turn to take-out and other convenience foods to make meal times more manageable, especially during the rush of back-to-school. However, there's a long school year ahead and focusing on good habits now can set the tone for the next nine months. The old adage that “food is fuel” rings true - healthy choices help kids maintain a healthy weight, avoid health problems, manage energy levels, and sharpen their minds.

BEFORE: Carthay Center located in Los Angeles County had a perfect underutilized location for a school garden. (Photo: Louisa Cardenas)

AFTER: Carthay Center now uses its thriving garden for hands-on gardening lessons and outdoor learning. (Photo: Louisa Cardenas)

How can we reinforce healthy eating habits during the hustle and bustle of back-to-school? 

School gardening offers children opportunities to get outdoors and exercise while teaching them a useful skill. Gardens containing fruits and vegetables can revise attitudes about particular foods; there is even a correlation between growing fruits and vegetables and consumption of these products. Gardens are likely to transform food attitudes and habits and in school gardens this can be especially impactful when combined with nutrition education.

In addition to health and nutrition benefits, gardening also offers hands-on experiences in a variety of core curriculum which includes natural and social sciences, language arts, nutrition and math. This can play a big part in supporting your kids' education outside of the classroom.

Encouraging children to connect with food through a school garden is a way to establish healthier eating habits. Pictured, students in San Joaquin County learn about vermicomposting.

Benefits of school gardening:

  • Physical health
  • Social and emotional health
  • Academic achievement
  • School and community benefits
  • Enhance nutritional preferences, and
  • Increased self-esteem

Learn more with the UC Master Gardener Program

The UC Master Gardener Program is a community of volunteers across California, under the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, that extends research-based information on gardening to the public. If your school does not have a school garden program, contact the UC Master Gardener Program in your county to learn about the possibility of new school garden programming and other garden-education you and your children can participate in.  

The UC Master Gardener Program can connect you with local community gardens, and or provide the information you need to get started with your own school or home garden.  Many programs have relationships with local schools to support garden-based education. 

Students learning about Propagation at "Dig it Grow it, Eat it" a school garden program in Marin County.

“Dig it, Grow it, Eat it”

The UC Master Gardener Program in Marin County hosts a portable field trip for school-age youth called “Dig it, Grow it, Eat it.” This award-winning program emphasizes engagement and the many learning opportunities that take place in nature. Youth learn all about growing edible plants from seed to harvest and educators get the support of University-trained UC Master Gardener volunteers to deliver the curriculum. 

Whether or not you already have a school garden program your family can engage in, reach out to the UC Master Gardener Program to get the help and information you need to inspire healthy eating and an active lifestyle in your children.  Now is a great time to plan and plant your winter garden, just in time to get your kids back to school and excited to be learning … wherever that learning takes place!

Students who received garden-based nutrition education had improved knowledge of, preferences for, and attitudes toward fresh fruits and vegetables according to research. (Photo: Louisa Cardenas)

The UC Master Gardener volunteers are eager to help with all of your gardening needs. The UC Master Gardener Program can work with teachers and community volunteers to provide gardening information and consultation in the support of school gardens. With local programs based in more than 50 counties across California, there is sure to be a workshop or class near you. Visit our website to find your local UC Master Gardener Program, mg.ucanr.edu.

Posted on Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 11:24 AM
Tags: gardening (24), school (11), UC Master Gardener (2)

New Law Requires Annual Training for Anyone Applying Pesticides at School Sites

UC IPM online course[6] copy

[From the December 2016 issue of the UC IPM Green Bulletin] School is already back in session for many children in districts throughout California, and several others will be starting back to school in the next couple of weeks. While students and...

Posted on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 at 11:41 AM
Tags: amendment (1), antimicrobials (2), baits (2), child care (4), course (3), disinfectants (1), DPR (15), gels (1), Health Schools Act (1), HSA (1), law (3), management professionals (1), pesticide (14), reporting (1), risk (1), sanitizers (1), school (11), training (11), traps (6), ucipm (66), UCIPM (66), urbanCIPM (1)

A Healthy Start Back to School

classroom

As summer is quickly coming to a close, and most kids have already headed back to school or will be returning in the next couple of weeks, integrated pest management will be an expected and important tool for the upcoming school year. Classrooms,...

Posted on Thursday, August 21, 2014 at 9:55 AM

Ever explore an artichoke?

Have you ever seen young students explore an artichoke for the first time? Their faces look puzzled as they wonder if this green spiny thing they hold before them is even edible. What about a kiwi? Eyebrows furrow in bewilderment when kids encounter this fuzzy fruit for the first time. Our favorite kiwi quote from a fifth-grade student: “This smells like dirt.”

All jokes aside, in Fresno County, nutrition education is becoming a priority for teachers. The UC CalFresh Nutrition Education Program has worked with over 950 teachers at over 80 schools throughout the county this school year. Our teachers are innovative, and continue to be outstanding in their approach to nutrition education!

While there isn’t enough space to recognize all outstanding educators, we are excited to share a few examples of the ways teachers are going above and beyond to teach students nutrition.

Ayer students learn about edible plant parts.

At Ayer Elementary, kindergarten teachers John Schnell, Donna Johnston, Catherine Uribe, and Nancy Patrick have made healthy eating and active living a priority. They actively take part in nutrition education and monthly tastings provided by UC Calfresh. They often bring in additional healthy foods for the students to sample. Understanding the importance of nutrition in a family-setting, Ayer teachers have invited UC CalFresh to partner in providing kinder parents important nutrition tips to get the year off to a healthy start.  

 

 

Balderas students build healthy plates!
Following a lesson taught by a UC CalFresh program coordinator at Balderas Elementary, Mrs. Nunez’s third-grade class created a collage of “Sometime vs. Anytime” foods. Mrs. Nunez went the extra step to reinforce the key concept of enjoying foods in moderation.  Students took the information learned and made “anytime meals.” Students’ artwork was displayed in the hallway for all to see.

 

 

 

 

 

Kindergarten students at Burrough Elementary build a healthy breakfast!

“We put our milk in, we take the milk out…and we shake it all about."

It's breakfast time at Burroughs Elementary. Mrs. Mata-Webb’s kindergarten class learned the importance of breakfast through song and dance. Students practiced building a healthy breakfast by including three of the five food groups at breakfast time.

 

 

 

Food Service staff at Viking Elementary
Dedicated to ensuring the health of our students, food service staff in Fresno Unified have also gone the extra mile to help promote our adult nutrition education classes and workshops.

The educators and school staff spotlighted provide a glimpse of the endless examples of excellent nutrition education happening in Fresno County. Statewide, the UC CalFresh Nutrition Education Program is very fortunate to work with such amazing educators. At the University of California Cooperative Extension, we’re working through schools to teach kids good food habits and decision-making skills.

If you would like to have the UC CalFresh Nutrition Education Program at your school contact Shelby MacNab, (559) 600-7222 or smacnab@ucdavis.edu. For additional information, visit our website.

Posted on Thursday, July 5, 2012 at 8:41 AM
  • Author: Shelby MacNab
  • Author: Brittanny Zweigle
  • Contributor: Angelita Zaragoza
  • Contributor: Elizabeth Villalobos
Tags: nutrition education (19), school (11)

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